As Published In
Oracle Magazine
July/August 2014

COMMENT

  

Time Capsule

  

1951

Tape Drive

o44timecapsule-UnivacSystem
The Remington Rand UNISERVO was the primary I/O device on the UNIVAC I computer, and stored up to 224 KB on a 1,200-foot-long metal tape.

 

1956

Hard Disk

The refrigerator-sized IBM 350 disk drive held 3.75 MB and leased for US$3,200 a month. Inflation adjusted, that’s nearly US$28,000 today—or US$7,400 per MB.

o44timecapsule-IBM350

(Hear why at bit.ly/1mxbHMu.)

  

1970s

Floppy Disks

“Hello, IT? Get me those latest figures . . .”

Data storage in the ’70s and into the ’80s? Floppy. From 8-inch to 5¼-inch to 3½-inch, these disks of thin, flexible magnetic storage medium were state of the art. Just ask your mom.

o44timecapsule-Floppy-disk

 

1999

SD Cards

Initially 64 MB, the Secure Digital (SD) memory card storage from SanDisk, Matsushita, and Toshiba has been getting smaller in size and larger in capacity ever since. (Today’s MicroSD holds 128 GB.)

o44timecapsule-SD-Cards

  

2000

USB Flash Drive

The first ThumbDrive from Trek Technology plugged into any USB port and offered a whopping 8 MB storage capacity. And within just a few years, thumb drives were making fashion statements. Sushi, anyone?

o44timecapsule-Sushiusb

  

2011

Storage from A to ZFS

Organizations are optimizing storage with tiered Sun flash, disk, and tape solutions from Oracle and enabling unified storage with the Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance.

o44timecapsule-JA11-cover

 

2013

Extreme Memory

In a single rack, Oracle’s Exadata Database Machine X4 supports 88 TB of user data in flash—a capacity sufficient to hold the majority of online transaction processing databases in flash memory.

 

o24timeline-yourturn


 From 8-inch floppies to 88 TB in flash, tell us about your first storage, your ultimate storage, and where you think storage will be in five years. Visit Facebook/OracleMagazine and let us know.

 


 Send us your comments