Asynchronously Invoking the ODI Scenario from the BPEL Process with Callback

Purpose

This tutorial walks you through the steps that are needed to manage a long-running Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) Scenario from the BPEL Process by invoking the ODI scenario asynchronously using callbacks. This demonstrates a more advanced approach by wrapping the ODI scenario with a Java service to manage the asynchronous communication with the BPEL process.

 

Time to Complete

Approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes

Topics

This OBE tutorial covers the following topics:

 Overview

Scenario

 Verifying the Prerequisites
 Creating a New Application in JDeveloper and Deploying the ODI Wrapper Service to the Oracle Application Server
 Creating a New BPEL Process
 Updating the BPEL Process Interface
 Creating a Partner Link Representation of the ODIInvokerService
 Creating BPEL Preferences to Dynamically Update Process-Level Values
 Assigning the ODIStarterWebservice Input Values
 Encrypting and Setting the Password for the Callback
 Receiving the Asynchronous Reply
 Catching Possible Remote Faults
 Setting Default Input for Invoking the Process
 Deploying Your BPEL Project
 Testing the Process
 Summary

Viewing Screenshots

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Note: Alternatively, you can place the cursor over each individual icon in the following steps to load and view only the screenshot associated with that step.

The screenshots will not reflect the specific environment that you are using. They are provided to give you an idea of where to locate specific functionality in Oracle Data Integrator.

Overview

ODI provides a synchronous and asynchronous Web services interface for applications to invoke ODI scenarios out of the box. Currently, ODI can execute a Web service asynchronously, but when the Web service is completed, it cannot reference back to the ODI job and signal that it completed successfully or failed. The callback reference allows ODI to call a Web service asynchronously and the Web service then knows where to call back ODI when the job is finished, to signal the outcome of the job. If a BPEL business process uses this interface to invoke a large, long-running load, it is likely that the synchronous invocation will time out before the ODI load is complete. In this example, you deploy a Java Web service (ODIInvokerService) as an intermediary between BPEL and ODI. BPEL invokes the Java service and passes the ODI scenario details. The Java service then invokes the ODI load through the ODI API. When the load is complete, the Java service asynchronously calls back the BPEL instance through the BPEL PM’s Java API, or by changing a parameter within the invocation of the Web service. The callback is performed using WS addressing. Thus, BPEL can asynchronously interact with long-running ODI loads. The Java service is built generically so that any ODI scenario can be called from any Web service process.

 

 

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Scenario

Linda works as a database administrator for Global Enterprise. In Global Enterprise, Linda is responsible for performing database management and integration tasks on various resources within the organization. In particular, Linda is responsible for data loading, transformation, and validation. She needs to manage long-running Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) scenarios from BPEL processes. If the BPEL business process uses this interface to invoke a large, long-running load, the synchronous invocation will time out before the ODI load is complete. For that reason, Linda makes a decision to invoke the ODI scenarios asynchronously using callbacks.

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Verifying the Prerequisites

Before you start the tasks, make sure that your system environment meets the following requirements:

Software Requirements

The system should include the following installed products:

The system should include the following configuration:

  • odi-public-ws.aar must be deployed in Axis2. Use the Upload Service link on the Axis2 admin page to upload this file (download from here).
  • The ODI Master and Work repository must be created. You can refer to the steps from here.
  • The xml, xtd, and csv files for the examples must be available. For example, the GEO_DIM.xml file that is included with this sample has much data and is approximately 8 MB to demonstrate using a moderately sized XML file with ODI and BPEL. You can download the complete set of demo/xml files from here.
  • The schema ( ODI_STAGE) for the target tables of the exercise and a data server and physical schema for this schema must be available within the ODI Topology Manager. To do this, perform the following steps:
    • Start the Oracle Database 10g XE Administrative Console.
    • Log in using system as the Username and oracle1 as the Password.
    • From the Enterprise Manager Console, select Administration > Database Users > Create Users.
    • Provide the username as ODI_STAGE and password as oracle1.
    • Select the DBA check box and click Create. Note that the ODI_STAGE user is created.
    • Select Start > All Programs > Oracle > Oracle Data Integrator > Topology Manager to open the ODI Topology Manager.
    • Scroll down the pane at the bottom left to click the Physical Architecture tab.
    • At the top-left corner, under the Physical Architecture pane, click " +" to expand Technologies > Oracle.
    • Right-click Oracle and select Insert Data Server.
    • The Data Server: new Window appears. Enter the name as Local_XE, Instance / dblink (Data Server) as XE, User as ODI_STAGE, and password as oracle1. Next, click the JDBC tab.
    • For the JDBC Driver value, click the Browse button and select Oracle JDBC Driver from the Name drop-down list. Click OK.
    • For the JDBC Url value, click the Browse button and select jdbc:<hostname>:<port>:<sid>. Click OK. Populate the values as per your environment details.
    • Click Test, Test again, and then click OK.
    • Click OK in the Data Server: new window.
    • Under the Physical Architecture pane, click " +" to expand Technologies > Oracle > Local_XE.
    • In the Physical Schema: Local_XE.Schema window, under the Definitions tab, select ODI_STAGE from the Schema (Schema) drop-down list and ODI_STAGE from the Schema (Work Schema) drop-down list.
    • Click the Context tab.
    • Click Add context. Select Global from the Context drop-down list and set Logical Schema as ODI_STAGE.
    • Click OK.
  • This example uses a number of supplied files and the sources, which are located in the OBE_LABS directory. Download the OBE_LABS.zip file from here and extract them into your machine in the same directory as JDeveloper (for example: G:\OBE_LABS).

If not done before, start the services and components for Database 10g XE, Oracle Data Integrator 10g (10.1.3.4), and Oracle SOA Suite 10g.

It is required that you complete the OBE titled Developing an ODI XML Transformation That Can Be Executed Within a BPEL Process before attempting this OBE. It is also recommended that you complete the OBE titled Creating an ODI Error Hospital That Uses the BPEL Human Workflow .

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Creating a New Application in JDeveloper and Deploying the ODI Wrapper Service to the Oracle Application Server


In this part of the example, you deploy the Java Wrapper Service, ODIInvokerService, to the Oracle Application Server. To create a new application and deploy the ODI wrapper service to the Oracle Application Server, perform the following steps:

1.

Start JDeveloper by clicking jdeveloper.exe in G:\jdevStudio10131. Alternatively, use the SOA Suite JDeveloper shortcut on the desktop. If a dialog box opens that asks if you would like to migrate from a previous version of JDeveloper, click No. In the Applications Navigator on the left, right-click Applications and select New Application.

 

2.

In the window that opens, enter BPEL2ODIAsync in the Application Name field. Click OK.

 

3.

In the Create Project window that appears, click Cancel. The BPEL2ODIAsync application appears in the Applications Navigator.

 

4.

Select File > Open. Browse to the G:\ODIInvokerService_generation2 directory and select the ODIInvokerService.jpr file. Click Open and the ODIInvokerService appears in the Applications Navigator.

Note: At this point, you have imported the Java Wrapper Service ( ODIInvokerService) that acts as the intermediary between BPEL and ODI. It is recommended that you take some time to browse the classes and details of the service to gain an understanding of how it works. Note that the Java application contains two interfaces: a synchronous Web service interface ( ODIAsyncStarterWebService) and a stand-alone Java interface ( odi-async-standalone.jar). You will be invoking the Web service interface, which requires to pass callback information to call back the correct BPEL instance via the BPEL API and the ODI information to invoke the correct ODI scenario via the ODI API.

 

6.

To configure the library locations that will be used at run time, right-click the ODIInvokerService in the Applications Navigator and select Project Properties. In the window that opens, select Libraries from the Explorer on the left. From the Libraries list, select the Orabpel.jar library and click Edit. On the Edit Library Definition window, highlight the current Class Path value and click Remove.

 

 

7.

Highlight Class Path: and click Add Entry. Browse to your SOA_HOME/bpel/lib directory ( E:\SOASuite10131\bpel\lib) and select orabpel.jar (if you get this library from another location, ensure that it is the same version as your installed SOA Suite). Click Select. On the Edit Library Definition window, ensure that the Deployed by Default check box is selected and click OK.

 

8.

Similarly, from the Libraries list, select the Orabpel-common.jar library and click Edit. In the window that appears, highlight the current Class Path value and click Remove. Highlight Class Path: and click Add Entry. Browse to your SOA_HOME/bpel/lib directory ( E:\SOASuite10131\bpel\lib) and select orabpelcommon.jar (if you get this library from another location, ensure that it is the same version as your installed SOA Suite). On the Edit Library Definition window, ensure that the Deployed by Default check box is selected and click OK.

 

9.

On the Project Properties page, make sure that Export is selected for all the libraries that you edited and click OK. From the Applications Navigator, right-click ODIInvokerService and select Rebuild.

10.

To deploy the Java service, ensure that you have a connection configured in JDeveloper to your application server, and that it is up and running. In the Applications Navigator, expand Applications > BPEL2ODIAsync > ODIInvokerService > Resources. Right-click WebServices.deploy and select Deploy to > your application server connection (for example, SoademoApplicationServer as shown in the screenshot). Click OK in any windows that appear. The Deployment Log appears at the bottom of the page and displays a message indicating that the deployment is complete as shown below.

 

11.

To verify that the service is deployed and accessible, open Application Server Control in a browser ( http://localhost:8888/em/). Log in using your administrator credentials (User name: oc4jadmin and Password: welcome1). On the Enterprise Manager page, select the oc4j container to which you deployed ODIInvokerService (Home JVMs). On the OC4J Home page, click the Applications tab. On the Applications tab, under default, locate and select the odi-webservice application.

 

12.

On the odi-webservice page, click the Web Services tab, and then click the Test Service button.

13. On the new page, retain the default URL and click Test Web Service. Click the Test Service button. The ODIAsyncStarterWebservice page appears. It contains an HTML form to invoke ODIInvokerService as well as links to the WSDL service definition and documentation. Click the Service Description link. In JDeveloper, save your work by selecting File > Save All.

Note: Do not close the last page that you opened as you need it to copy the WSDL URL location in the next section. At this point, you do not test the service but you can see the input fields that are used to call the ODI scenario, and then call back to the BPEL process. The ODIINvokerService is now deployed and ready to run.

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Creating a New BPEL Process

To create a new BPEL process, perform the following steps:

1.

In the Applications Navigator on the left, right-click BPEL2ODIAsync and select New Project. In the window that appears, select BPEL Process Project and click OK.

 

 

2.

On the BPEL Project Creation Wizard screen, name the project AsyncODICall and ensure that Asynchronous BPEL Process is selected. Click Next. Click the Flashlight icon next to the Input Schema Element field. Browse to your OBE_LABS directory and select ODIService.xsd. Click Open.

 

 

3.

In the Type Chooser window, expand Imported Schemas > ODIService.xsd and select ODIProcessRequest. Click OK.

 

4.

Click the Flashlight icon next to the Output Schema Element field. In the Type Chooser window, expand Imported Schemas > ODIService.xsd and select ODIProcessResponse. Click OK.

 

 

5.

Click Finish on the BPEL Project Creation Wizard screen. Your new AsyncODICall project opens in the main JDeveloper window. Save your project (select File > Save All).

 

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Updating the BPEL Process Interface

In the steps that follow, you modify the BPEL process interface that is created by default to include two new operations. These two operations are added to the inbound port type in WSDL. They are used to receive the asynchronous response from ODIInvokerService that you deployed earlier.

 

To update the BPEL process interface, perform the following steps:

1.

In the Application Navigator on the left, expand BPEL2ODIAsync > AsyncODICall > Integration Content and double-click AsyncODICall.wsdl to open it. In the AsyncODICall.wsdl file, click the Switch View button  at the top left. With the AsyncODICall.wsdl file open in the main pane, locate the Structure pane (you may need to click View > Structure). Expand definitions and right-click Messages. Select Insert Message. In the window that appears, name the message ODIInvokerServiceResponseMessage. Click OK.

 

2.

Right-click ODIInvokerServiceResponseMessage and select Insert inside message - ODIInvokerServiceResponseMessage > http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/ > part. In the window that appears, name the part payload. Select the Reference Type to be element. Enter ns1:ODIInvokerServiceResponse in the Part Type field. Click OK.


 

3.

Similarly, in the Structure pane, expand definitions and right-click Messages. Select Insert Message. In the window that appears, name the message ODIInvokerServiceFaultMessage. Click OK. Right-click the ODIInvokerServiceFaultMessage and select Insert inside ODIInvokerServiceFaultMessage >http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl > part. Name the part payload. Select the Reference Type to be element. Enter ns1:ODIInvokerServiceFault in the Part Type field. Click OK.


 

 

4.

Verify that your AsyncODICall.wsdl has the structure as shown below.

 

5.

Under Port Types, select and right-click AsyncODICall. Select Insert inside AsyncODICall > http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/ > operation. In the window that appears, name the operation onODIResult. Select One Way from the Operation Type drop-down list. Select client:ODIInvokerServiceResponseMessage from the Input drop-down list and click OK. A new operation appears under initiate.

 

6.

Again under Port Types, select and right-click AsyncODICall. Select Insert inside AsyncODICall > http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/ > operation. In the window that appears, name the operation onODIError. Select One Way from the Operation Type drop-down list. Select client:ODIInvokerServiceFaultMessage from the Input drop-down list and click OK. A new operation appears under initiate.

 

7.

Verify that your AsyncODICall.wsdl has the structure as shown below. Save your project (select File > Save All) and close the AsyncODICall.wsdl file. Click the AsyncODICall.bpel file tab and click the green check mark at the top of the page. This should refresh the BPEL process with the changes that you just made (you may have to close and reopen the BPEL file for the changes to take effect).

Note: You have now updated the BPEL interface by creating two new operations: onODIResult and onODIError.

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Creating a Partner Link Representation of ODIInvokerService

In the following steps, you create a BPEL Partner Link that represents the Java Wrapper Service ODIInvokerService. To create the Partner Link representation of the ODIInvokerService, perform the following steps.

1.

From the Components Palette, select PartnerLink and drag it into the gray Services swim lane to the right of the diagram. In the Create Partner Link window, name this Partner Link ODIAsyncStarterWebservice. Copy the WSDL URL for the deployed ODIInvokerService from the Oracle Application Server Control page (you should have it open in the browser) and paste it into the WSDL File field in the Create Partner Link window. Click the blue double arrow button to refresh the page. A window appears that asks whether you would like it to create the partner links for you. Click Yes.

 

2.

From the Partner Link Type drop-down list, select ODIAsyncStarterWebservice_PL. From the Partner Role drop-down list, select ODIAsyncStarterWebservice_Role. Leave the other fields with the defaults and click OK. The ODIAsyncStarterWebservice Partner Link appears in your process diagram.

 

3.

From the Components Palette at the right, select Process Activities from the drop-down list, and then drag the Invoke activity onto your process between the receiveInput and callbackClient activities. Drag one of the arrows from the new Invoke activity onto the ODIAsyncStarterWebservice Partner Link.

 

4.

In the Edit Invoke window, name the activity Invoke_ODI. Click the Magic Wand icon next to the Input Variable field. In the Create Variable window, name the variable startOdiPlan_InputVariable. Click OK.

 

5. Click the Magic Wand icon next to the Output Variable field. In the Create Variable window, name the variable startOdiPlan_OutputVariable. Click OK. Click OK in the Edit Invoke window. Your process diagram should look as shown below. Save your project.

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Creating BPEL Preferences to Dynamically Update Process-Level Values

In this section, you create five BPEL preferences (global variables are set at the process level) so that you do not have to recompile the process if you want to change these values. The BPEL process passes the callback information to ODIInvokerService so that it can asynchronously call back at a later time. This information is server-specific. By creating these preferences, you will not need to recompile the process when redeploying to a new server.

To create BPEL preferences to dynamically update process-level values, perform the following steps:

1.

In the AsynchODICall.bpel process window, click the Deployment Descriptor Properties icon at the top-left of the diagram. In the window that appears, click Create on the Preferences tab. In the Create Preference dialog box, name the preference retryCount. Click OK.

 

 

2.

In the Property Value box, enter 1. From the Encryption drop-down list, select Plain Text. Click the Create icon and repeat the preceding steps for the preferences in the following table. You should have your Deployment Descriptor Properties as shown in the following screenshot. Click OK.

Note: Some of the property values are specific to your environment. The values here are generally correct if you have performed a basic SOA installation. Check your values.

Property Name Property Value Encryption

java.naming.factory.initial

com.evermind.server.rmi.RMIInitialContextFactory Plain Text

java.naming.provider.url

opmn:ormi://localhost:6003:home/orabpel Plain Text
OC4JUser oc4jadmin Plain Text
Credentials welcome1 Encrypt on server
on deploy
Platform ias_10g Plain Text

 

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Assigning the ODIStarterWebservice Input Values

To assign ODIStarterWebservice input values, perform the following steps:

1.

From the Components Palette at the right, drag an Assign activity onto the process diagram between the receive_Input and Invoke_ODI activities.

 

 

2.

Double-click the new Assign_1 activity. Click the General tab and name the activity Assign_ODIValues. Click the Copy Operation tab and from the Create drop-down list, select Copy Operation.


 

3.

In the window that opens, in the From column, expand Process > Variables > inputVariable > payload > ODIProcessRequest > ODI_Info. In the To column, expand Process > Variables > startOdiPlan_InputVariable > parameters > StartOdiPlanElement > OdiInformationDTO_1. Click OK.

 

4.

Now set the preferences from the last section. From the Create drop-down list, select Copy Operation. A new dialog box appears. In the From column, from the Type drop-down list, select Expression. Click the Xpath Expression Builder button at the top-right of the From column.

 

5.

In the Expression Builder window, under the Functions heading, select BPEL Xpath Extension Functions from the drop-down list. From the updated list, select getPreference and click the Insert Into Expression button. The Expression window now contains ora:getPreference(). Change this to ora:getPreference("retryCount"), where retryCount is the name of one of the preferences that you set earlier. Click OK.

 

6.

In the To column, expand Process > Variables > startOdiPlan_InputVariable > parameters > StartOdiPlanElement > CallbackInformationDTO_2 > retryAttempts. Click OK.

 

7.

Repeat the above steps (that created the retryCount copy rule from a preference) to create copy rules for the other preferences. The From and To fields are listed in the following table. Your Assign activity with the six copy rules should now match the following screenshot.

From To

ora:getPreference("java.naming.factory.initial")

jndiInitialCtxFactory

ora:getPreference("java.naming.provider.url")

jndiURL
ora:getPreference("OC4JUser") user
ora:getPreference("Platform") jndiPlatform

 

 

You still need to create eight more copy rules. For each row in the following table, create a copy rule, select Expression in the From column and enter the corresponding value from the following table. In the To column expand Process > Variables > startOdiPlan_InputVariable > parameters > StartOdiPlanElement > CallbackInformationDTO_2 and select the value that matches the value from the table. Your copy operation should now have 14 copy rules inside it and look similar to the following screenshot. Click OK.

From To

string("callback.bpel")

callbackHandlerType

string("onODIResult")

callbackSuccessOperationName
string("onODIError") callbackErrorOperationName
ora:getProcessURL() SOAPUrl
ora:getDomainId() domainName
ora:getProcessId() processName
ora:getProcessVersion() revision
ora:getConversationId() conversationID

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Encrypting and Setting the Password for the Callback

ODIInvokerService expects the password to be sent encrypted and hashed with the process conversation ID. You use the Java Embedding activity to encrypt the password. To encrypt and set the password for the callback, perform the following steps:

1.

From the Components Palette, drag the Java Embedding activity onto the diagram below the Assign_ODIValues activity. Double-click the new Java_Embedding_1 activity to open it.

 

 

2.

In the Code Snippet field, cut and paste the code provided below. To save your project, select File > Save All.

/* The following code appends the Credentials preference
with the instance conversation ID,then encrypts and
assigns to the ODIInvokerService input message.
*/                
String pw = (String)getPreference("Credentials");
try {
String encryptedPW =
com.collaxa.cube.util.CXPasswordUtils.encrypt(pw + "||" + getConversationId());
addAuditTrailEntry("Credentials Encrypted");
setVariableData ("startOdiPlan_InputVariable","parameters",
"/ns1:startOdiPlanElement/ns1:CallbackInformationDTO_2/ns1:pw", encryptedPW);
} catch(Exception e) {
e.printStackTrace();
addAuditTrailEntry("Encryption failed: " + e.getMessage());
javax.xml.namespace.QName qname = new
javax.xml.namespace.QName
("http://bpel.oracle.com/", "EncryptionFailure");
throw new com.oracle.bpel.client.BPELFault (qname);
}
addAuditTrailEntry ("Added encrypted credentials successfully");

 


 

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Receiving the Asynchronous Reply

You use a Pick activity to handle the callback from ODIInvokerService. You need to set handlers for both the response messages, onODIResponse and onODIError, as well as a timeout activity. To receive the asynchronous reply, perform the following steps:

1.

From the Components Palette at the right, drag a Pick activity onto the diagram after the Invoke_ODI activity. Expand the new Pick_1 activity. Click the Add OnMessage Branch icon.

 

 

2.

Double-click the message branch at the extreme left of the Pick activity. In the window that appears, click the Flashlight icon next to the Partner Link field. Expand Process > Partner Links > client. Click OK.


 

3.

From the Operation drop-down list, select onODIResult. Click the Magic Wand icon next to the Variable field. Name the variable OnMessage_onODIResult and click OK. Click OK in the OnMessage Branch window.

 

4.

Double-click the remaining (right) message branches of the Pick activity. In the window that appears, click the Flashlight icon next to the Partner Link field. Expand Process > Partner Links > client. Click OK.

 

5.

From the Operation drop-down list, select onODIError. Click the Magic Wand icon next to the Variable field. Name the variable OnMessage_onODIError and click OK. Click OK in the OnMessage Branch window.

 

6.

Double-click the onAlarm branch. Change Time from 1 day to 1 hour (or whatever time is appropriate for your load to complete) as shown below. Click OK.

 

7.

Expand all three branches. From the Components Palette, drag an Assign activity into all the three branches as shown below.

 

8.

Open Assign_1 in the first ( onODIResponse) onMessage branch. Create new copy rules to map the following variables and expressions to the output variable as shown in the following table (refer to the examples of screenshots below).

From Type From To
Variable

Variable OnMessage_onODIResult > Payload > ODIInvokerServiceResponse > odiPlan

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResponse > odiPlan

Variable

O nMessage_onODIResult > Payload > ODIInvokerServiceResponse > elapsedTime

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResponse > elapsedTime

Expression ‘Success’

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResponse > result

Expression ora:getConversationId()

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResponse> ConversationId

 

 

9.

Click the General tab and name the activity Assign_ODIResponse. Click OK.

10.

Double-click to open Assign_2 in the second ( onODIError) onMessage branch. Create new copy rules to map the following variables and expressions to the output variable as shown in the following table. Your Assign_2 activity should look similar to the following screenshot. Click the General tab and name the activity Assign_ODIError. Click OK.

From Type From To
Variable

OnMessage_onODIError > Payload >ODIInvokerServiceFault> odiPlan

 

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResponse > odiPlan

 

Variable

OnMessage_onODIError > Payload > ODIInvokerServiceFault> elapsedTime

 

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResponse> elapsedTime

Variable

OnMessage_onODIError > Payload > ODIInvokerServiceFault> errorMessage

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResponse> result

Expression ora:getConversationId()

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResponse> ConversationId

 

 

11.

Open the Assign_3 activity in the third onAlarm branch. Create new copy rules to map the following variables and expressions to the output variable as shown in the following table. Your Assign_3 activity should look similar to what is shown below. Click the General tab and name the activity Assign_TimeOut. Click OK.

From Type From To
Expression

'Timeout waiting for ODI to complete load'

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResponse > result

Expression

ora:getConversationId()

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResp onse > ConversationId

Expression

ora:getContentAsString(bpws:getVariableData('inputVariable', 'payload',
'/ns2:ODIProcessRequest/ns2:ODI_Info'))

OutputVariable > Payload > ODIProcessResp onse > odiPlan

 

12.

Verify that your process diagram matches the following image. Click the Validate Process icon  at the top of the process diagram to refresh and validate your process. Save your project ( File > Save All).

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Catching Possible Remote Faults

If for some reason ODIInvokerService is not available, you need to catch the error and return a result.

To catch possible remote faults, perform the following steps:

1.

On the main process scope, click the Add Catch Branch icon. Scroll to the right and double-click the new Catch Branch icon to the right of the diagram. Click the Flashlight icon in the Fault Qname section.

 

2.

In the browser, select System Faults > remoteFault. Click OK.

3.

Click the Magic Wand icon next to the Fault Variable field to create a new variable. Enter RemoteFaultVar as the variable name and click OK. Click OK in the Catch Branch window.

 

4.

Expand the Catch activity. From the Components Palette at the right, drag an Invoke activity onto the diagram inside the empty catch branch. Double-click the new Invoke activity.

 

5.

Name the activity Invoke_Callback. Click the Flashlight icon next to the Partner Link field. Select client and click OK.

 

6.

Click the Magic Wand icon next to the Input Variable field. Name the new variable ErrorOutput. Click OK. Click OK in the Invoke activity window.

 

7.

From the Components Palette, drag an Assign activity into the Catch branch above the Invoke_Callback activity. Double-click the new Assign activity to open it. Create new copy rules to map the following variables and expressions to the ErrorOutput variable as shown in the following table.

From Type From To
Variable

RemoteFaultVar > summary

ErrorOutput > Payload >ODIProcessResponse > result

Expression

ora:getConversationId()

ErrorOutput > Payload > ODIProcessResponse >ConversationId

Expression

ora:getContentAsString( bpws:getVariableData('inputVariable',
'payload','/ns2:ODIProcessRequest/ns2:ODI_Info'))

ErrorOutput > Payload > ODIProcessResponse > odiPlan

 

8.

Verify that your Assign activity looks as shown below. Click the General tab and name the activity Assign_CallbackError. Click OK. Save your project. Your process diagram should now match the following image.

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Setting Default Input for Invoking the Process


In the following steps, you set default input to test the process from the BPEL Console later on. This prevents you from having to reenter data. To set default input for invoking the process, perform the following steps:

1.

Click the Deployment Descriptor Properties icon at the top of the main diagram. In the window that appears, click the Configurations tab.

 

2.

Click the Create icon and select defaultInput from the drop-down list. Click OK.

 

3.

Copy the the XML code provided below and paste it in the Property Value field. Click OK. Save your project.

<soap:Envelope xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
<soap:Header/>
<soap:Body xmlns:ns1="http://xmlns.oracle.com/ODIService">
<ns1:ODIProcessRequest>
<ns1:ODI_Info>
<ns1:odiHostname>localhost</ns1:odiHostname>
<ns1:jdbcDriver>oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver</ns1:jdbcDriver>
<ns1:logLevel>5</ns1:logLevel>
<ns1:sessionNumber>SCEN_IMPORTXFORMEXPORTXML</ns1:sessionNumber>
<!-- Include when ODI scenario expects parameters
<ns1:odiParameters>
<ns1:value></ns1:value>
<ns1:name></ns1:name>
</ns1:odiParameters> -->
<ns1:scenarioName>SCEN_IMPORTXFORMEXPORTXML</ns1:scenarioName>
<ns1:jdbcUrl>jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:XE</ns1:jdbcUrl>
<ns1:scenarioVersion>001</ns1:scenarioVersion>
<ns1:jdbcPassword>oracle1</ns1:jdbcPassword>
<ns1:workRepositoryCode>WORKREP</ns1:workRepositoryCode> <ns1:syncMode>SYNC</ns1:syncMode>
<ns1:odiHostPort>20910</ns1:odiHostPort>
<ns1:context>GLOBAL</ns1:context>
<ns1:odiPassword>SUNOPSIS</ns1:odiPassword>
<ns1:odiUser>SUPERVISOR</ns1:odiUser>
<ns1:jdbcUser>snpm</ns1:jdbcUser>
</ns1:ODI_Info>
</ns1:ODIProcessRequest>
</soap:Body>
</soap:Envelope>

Note: The above XML contains details to call a specific ODI scenario SCEN_IMPORTXFORMEXPORTXML, which was created in the OBE titled Developing an ODI XML Transformation That Can Be Executed Within a BPEL Process, in a specific ODI repository (WORKREP). If you are attempting to invoke your own scenario, make sure that you update the values in the above XML to properly represent the details of the ODI scenario. In this case, update the XML values to invoke your ODI scenario and remove the commented section if you are not passing any parameters.

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Deploying Your BPEL Project

To deploy your BPEL process, perform the following steps:

1.

From the Application Navigator at the left, expand BPEL2ODIAsync. Right-click your project AsyncODICall and select Deploy > SoademoIntegConnection > Deploy to default domain.

 

 

2.

In the logging window at the bottom of the page, click the Apache Ant - Log tab. Verify that Build Successful is displayed in green when the process has finished deploying.

Note: If you see any errors and/or your process fails to deploy, revisit the above steps to correct the errors.

 

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Testing the Process


In the following steps, you invoke the BPEL process from the BPEL console and check to see whether your ODI scenario ran. To test the process, perform the following steps:

1.

Open a browser and enter http://localhost:8888/BPELConsole as the URL. The Login page appears. Enter your application server credentials: oc4jadmin in the User field and welcome1 in the Password field. Click Login. The main BPEL Dashboard appears. Verify that your AsyncODICall BPEL project appears under the Deployed BPEL Processes column on the left.

 

 

2.

Select your AsyncODICall process in the list of processes at the left. Click the Descriptor tab. On this tab, you can view and set the preferences that you created in the earlier steps. Review and update any of these values if they are not correct.

.

 

 

 

3.

Return to the Initiate tab. From the Operation drop-down list, select initiate. Ensure that your ODI agent is running and your ODI scenario is ready to be invoked. Click the Post XML Message button to start the process. When the page refreshes, click the Visual Flow link to view the process execution.

 

4.

Click the Invoke_ODI activity to see the synchronous response from ODIInvokerService and verify that it has received the request successfully. Close the Invoke_ODI activity window.

 

5.

Click the Refresh View link  . This refreshes the page to receive the asynchronous callback when the load is complete. Open the callbackClient activity to see the result of the execution. Open ODI Operator and verify that your ODI scenario was invoked and successfully completed.

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Summary

In this lesson, you learned how to:

 Verify the Prerequisites
 Create a New Application in JDeveloper and Deploy the ODI Wrapper Service to the Oracle Application Server
 Create a New BPEL Process
 Update the BPEL Process Interface
 Create a Partner Link Representation of the ODIInvokerService
 Create BPEL Preferences to Dynamically Update Process-Level Values
 Assign the ODIStarterWebservice Input Values
 Encrypt and Set the Password for the Callback
 Receive the Asynchronous Reply
 Catch Possible Remote Faults
 Set Default Input for Invoking the Process
 Deploy your BPEL Project
 Test the Process

 

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