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Study: Higher Ed Sees Big Payoff for Investments in Better Student Services

A new survey of college students and administrators uncovered revealing statistics about the impact of student services on overall student satisfaction rates, and how higher education institutions can improve those services.

For example, more than 65 percent of college enrollees say student services have a direct impact on their overall satisfaction with their schools. But only 60 percent of students say their school meets their customer service expectations, and just 57 percent say their school treats them as valued customers.

The findings are part of a new report from Oracle titled, “Making the Grade: Optimizing the Higher Education Student Experience,” which summarizes feedback from more than 1,000 undergraduates and 180 higher education administrators.

These findings are explored in a new on-demand Webcast and will be central themes at the upcoming EDUCAUSE conference in November.

The Oracle report also found
  • Satisfaction with services makes students significantly more likely to recommend their school to other potential students and donate after graduation
  • Just 15 percent of students and 10 percent of administrators say their school is very successful at leveraging social media to keep students informed
  • Only 39 percent of students and 27 percent of administrators rank mobile access to their student services as very good
  • To improve services, 54 percent of students and 61 percent of administrators believe their schools should make it easier to determine where to find answers to questions
The survey also found that only 19 percent of administrators feel they have a single, comprehensive degree view of their students. A majority said they have multiple views of students and either must piece that information together or the information is conflicting.

"This report demonstrates that investments in student services technology pay long-term dividends,” says Cole Clark, global vice president, Oracle Education and Research. “Schools that focus on the basics (such as ensuring information accessibility, providing multiple contact points for students, and delivering consistent processes) and leverage mobile and social media platforms to engage students will provide an unforgettable, positive educational experience, and in turn, make institutions more competitive.”

Download the full report and view the Webcast in which experts discuss the significance of “Making the Grade: Optimizing the Higher Education Student Experience” and offer real-world examples of how technology can improve student services.


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