Introduction to Work Areas Print this Page
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Contents
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  1  Description
  2  Scoping a Work Area
  3  UI Shell
  4  Work Area Tab Models
        4.1  No-tabs Work Area Model
        4.2  Dynamic Tabs Work Area Model
  5  Work Area Information Area
        5.1  Work Area Naming Conventions
  6  Regional Area
  7  Local Area
  8  Contextual Area
  9  Work Area Entry Page
 10  Navigating to a Work Area
 11  How to Launch a Task
      11.1  Navigating in No-tabs Work Areas
      11.2  Task Flows in Dynamic Tabs Work Areas


Note: All images in this document are illustrative and do not represent actual Oracle Fusion application user interface (UI) screens.
 
1  Description
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A work area contains the complete set of tasks, searches, reports, embedded analytics, and other content that a user needs to accomplish a business goal.
 
2  Scoping a Work Area
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Scoping a work area starts with identifying a set of user roles and tasks related to a business goal.

The key criterion for combining tasks into a single work area is that users should not have to navigate among multiple work areas to accomplish a particular business goal.

For example, a maintenance worker's daily business activity is centered around completing assigned work orders. As part of completing a work order, the maintenance worker records details of the work performed, orders replacement parts, and enters timesheet information.

Because these are functionally different tasks, each might be placed in a different work area; however, this would require the maintenance worker to switch among multiple work areas to perform their business activities. Instead, these tasks should be integrated into a single work area to streamline users' work.

In Oracle Fusion, navigation models can be tailored to fit the needs of users and business processes. Figure 2.1 shows various ways in which dashboards and work areas can be configured to support user roles and their associated business processes.

Figure 1. A work area can be associated with zero or more dashboards and serve one or more user roles
Figure 2.1. A work area can be associated with zero or more dashboards and serve one or more user roles
3  UI Shell
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The UI Shell provides a five-part framework that organizes work area content and functionality in a consistent manner.

Figure 2. The UI Shell
Figure 2.2. The UI Shell
The framework includes:
  • Global Area
    • The global area remains consistent across all pages in a work area. Every dashboard and work area page has a global area.
    • The global area contains links to content and functionality that apply to all dashboards and work areas, such as administration tools, Navigator, Recent Items, Favorites, Watchlist, Tags, Global Search, and more.
    • Links and functionality in the global area enable users to navigate to content within and beyond the current work area.
  • Work Area Information Area
    • This area provides context for the work area by displaying the work area title (see figure 5.1). Content in this area applies to all pages within a work area.
  • Regional Area
    • Accordion panes within the collapsible regional area provide quick access to links and functionality that support the work area’s business goal. User interactions with regional area content drive the content of the local area.
  • Local Area
    • The local area is the focus of users’ work; this area contains all of the transactional tasks and information that users need to accomplish their business goals. User interactions with local area content drive the content of the contextual area.
  • Contextual Area
    • Accordion panes within the collapsible contextual area contain additional information and functionality that support users’ tasks in the local area. Use of the contextual area is optional.

These five areas organize relevant tasks, searches, reports and analytics, collaboration capabilities, and other content to provide all of the information and functionality that users need to complete their work accurately and efficiently. This structure enables users to stay in context while working on a business goal and work seamlessly through each task flow.

Users can expand or collapse the regional and contextual areas to control the use of the screen real estate depending on the task. Page content should be designed to have no more than one collapsible area open at a time.

For more information on the UI Shell and its functionality, see the Oracle Fusion Applications UI Shell Guideline.

 
4  Work Area Tab Models
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Work areas in Oracle Fusion Applications support two tab models: the No-tabs model and the Dynamic Tabs model. Each is designed to organize information in a manner that best supports the unique requirements of a work area. The choice of tab model depends on the complexity of a work area's objects, tasks, business goals, and processes.

Figure 3. Tab models in the UI Shell
Figure 4.1. Tab models in the UI Shell
4.1  No-tabs Work Area Model
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The No-tabs work area model is well suited for business processes in which users focus on one task at a time and do not need to work on multiple objects or tasks in parallel.

The local area displays only one page at a time; users generally navigate between pages by drilling down to another page and then returning to the previous page. See Navigation in a No-tabs Work Area.

 

4.2  Dynamic Tabs Work Area Model

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The Dynamic Tabs work area model is optimized for business processes that require users to work on multiple objects or tasks in parallel. The local area displays one or more pages in separate Level 2 tabs.

The Dynamic Tabs model uses the local area to combine a persistent Work Area Entry tab with dynamic tabs that users open and close for each task or object instance. With the exception of the static Work Area Entry tab, this model's tabs are dynamic because they open and close as a result of direct user interaction. The dynamic tabs model enables users to open task flows in dynamic tabs in a number of different ways (for example, from within another tab or from the Tasks or Regional Area Search panes).

For more information, see the Dynamic Tabs Work Area Guideline.

 
5  Work Area Information Area
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The work area information area is located directly below the global area and above the regional, local, and contextual areas. Information inside the work area information area applies to all pages within a work area. The work area information area contains the work area title (see figure 5.1).

Figure 4a. The work area title appears inside the Work Area Information Area
Figure 5.1. In this example from the Shipments work area, the work area title appears inside the work area information area
The work area title serves two purposes:
  • Orients users to the context in which they are currently performing their work.
  • Serves as a link that always navigates back to the Work Area Entry page (see figure 5.2) in the No-tabs model or selects the Work Area Entry tab in the Dynamic Tabs model.
Figure 4b. Clicking on the work area title navigates to the Work Area Entry page
Figure 5.2. Clicking the work area title navigates you to the Work Area Entry page
In Oracle Fusion, dashboards and work area titles to which users have access appear in the Navigator menu in the global area. The work area title in the work area information area generally matches the item in the Navigator menu (see figure 5.3).
Figure 4c: Example of a work area title in the Navigator menu and the Work Area Information Area
Figure 5.3. Example of a work area title in the Navigator menu and the work area information area

5.1  Work Area Naming Conventions

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The work area title should represent the name of the key object type in the work area (for example, Contracts or Items) or a business process (such as, Asset Tracking or Order Orchestration). Follow these guidelines:

  • Use the simple noun form when naming an object type or business goal.
  • Use the plural form when appropriate.
 
6  Regional Area
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Figure 5: The Regional Area of the UI Shell
Figure 6.1. The regional area of the UI Shell
The regional area is a collapsible section on the left side of the page below the work area information area. Accordion panes within the regional area contain content that:
  • Applies to all object types and object instances within the work area
  • Provides quick access to links and functionality that support the work area’s business goal
  • Is designed to support the unique business goal of a specific work area and is, therefore, unique to each work area
  • Remains consistent across each page of a work area

The regional area is open by default on the Overview (Work Area Entry) page.

User interactions in regional area panes drive content changes in the local area. See the Regional Area section of the UI Shell Guideline and the Panel Accordion Usage Guideline.

The standard regional area accordion panes are listed in their suggested order (from top to bottom):

  • Tasks
    • The Tasks pane is a standard pane in the Regional Area that contains a list of links to tasks. Clicking a task name navigates to the corresponding task flow in the local area. For example, clicking the Manage Shipments link in the Tasks pane navigates to the Manage Shipments page in the local area.
    • For more information on the Tasks pane, see the Tasks Pane Guideline.
       
  • Activity Guide (optional)
    • In an activity guide, users follow a defined sequence of milestones to complete a set of tasks. Milestones and tasks appear in a regional area pane that reflects overall progress and the status of each task. Users expand a milestone to view associated tasks, then click a task name to open that task in the local area.
    • For more information on activity guides, see the Activity Guide design pattern.
       
  • Quick Create (optional)
    • The Quick Create pane enables users to create a new object related to and in support of the current local area task flow.
    • With Quick Create, users can create a new object by entering fewer fields than the object otherwise requires when created in the local area.
    • For details, see the Quick Create design pattern.
       
  • Search (optional)
    • The regional area search pane enables users to initiate a search at any time without having to first navigate to a page in the local area. Search results appear in the local area.
  • Reports and Analytics (optional)
    • The Reports and Analytics pane provides shortcuts to pre-seeded analytic content specific to that work area. For more information, see the Reports and Analytics Pane Guideline.
       
  • Others
    • Custom panes with content specific to a work area can be added as needed.
 
7  Local Area
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The central part of the page, or local area, is the focus of users’ work. This area displays all of the tasks and information that users need to accomplish their business goals. In Dynamic Tabs work areas, the local area and its related contextual area are embedded within each tab (see figure 7.1).

Figure 6. The Local Area of the UI Shell
Figure 7.1. The local area of the UI Shell
For more information about local area content and functionality, see the design patterns and guidelines on Fusion GPS. Some of the key resources include:
 
8  Contextual Area
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The contextual area is an optional, collapsible section on the right side of the page below the work area information area. Accordion panes within the contextual area contain controls and content tied to and driven by local area content. As task flows change and users interact with local area content, contextual area content changes and updates accordingly. This feature is a unique innovation in Oracle Fusion that provides additional information in context.

Figure 7. The Contextual Area of the UI Shell
Figure 8.1. The contextual area of the UI Shell
Contextual area content is useful for showing derived or computed information that can help users make an informed decision or complete a task. Within a work area, contextual area panes should be used only when appropriate. Contextual area content has no significance or useful meaning without the corresponding local area context. Common examples of contextual area content include:
  • Decision support
    • For example, business intelligence data, analytics, and context-sensitive reference information
  • Content collection containers

Contextual area accordion pane content changes and updates as users:

  • Edit information or change the current value of a selected field or component in the local area
  • Change cursor location or component selection in the local area

For more information, see the Contextual Area section of the UI Shell Guideline

 
9  Work Area Entry Page
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The work area entry page is the entry point in every Oracle Fusion work area when users access a work area without navigating to a specific page. For example, users navigate to the work area entry page when selecting a work area title in the Navigator menu.

The objective of this page is to inform users of the work that needs to be done in that work area and in what priority, and to offer direct navigation to task flows and detailed information. In Oracle Fusion, the intent is to deliver actionable insights and information to users upon arrival in a work area, instead of requiring them to search for this information.

An Overview page is the preferred type of work area entry page. An Overview page provides actionable status and summary information across all objects in the work area. An Overview page presents data as information designed to help users identify and act upon open issues within the work area. Content may also include lists of notifications and outstanding work, such as tasks in progress and summaries of exceptions. Users can drill down from information on this page to initiate a task flow or view detailed information.

If actionable status and summary information are not available due to the nature of the work area, or if the only way a user can begin work is by performing a transactional search, a Manage page can be a Work Area Entry page. A Manage page contains transactional search functionality and a section for search results. Using a Manage page is considered a less desirable entry experience because, unlike the Overview page that delivers tasks and information to users, a Manage page requires users to search. For more information on Manage pages, see the following design patterns:

In most cases, the work area entry page is, therefore, an Overview page.

For more information on work area entry pages, see

Figure 8. Example of a work area Overview page
Figure 9.1. Example of a work area Overview page
  • In No-tabs work areas, users always eventually return to the Work Area Entry page after completing a task (see figure 11.1).
  • In Dynamic Tabs work areas, the work area entry page is always the first tab. This tab is persistent and cannot be closed.
 
10  Navigating to a Work Area
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Users can navigate to a work area in a variety of ways. Depending on the starting point or action, work entry points can include the Work Area Entry page, a Manage page, or a Detail page. Common points of origin include links and functionality in the global area of all pages (see figure 11.2), such as:

Users can also navigate from a dashboard to a work area by selecting a link in the dashboard's regional or local areas, or by searching in the regional area Search pane.

 
11  How to Launch a Task
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Task flows are always performed inside a work area and can be initiated from outside or, more commonly, from within a work area. Task flows can be initiated from:

 

11.1  Navigating in No-Tabs Work Areas

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In the No-tabs work area model, users navigate back to the referring page within the work area upon completion of a task flow. The following tables contain common examples of basic flows in No-tabs work areas:

Example 1: Drill Down from the Work Area Overview Page

Figure 9a: Example of a task flow that begins on an Overview page

  1. Overview page
    • The user selects a detailed summary link in the local area and navigates to the corresponding Manage page.

  2. Manage page
    • The local area search region is collapsed; search fields contain criteria.
       
    • The number of records in the editable search results table reflects the value of the summary link selected on the Overview page.

    • The user selects one object in the search results table and drills down to the corresponding object instance Detail page.

  3. Detail page
    • The user views and possibly edits the content.
       
    • The user selects a final page-level action and then navigates back to the referring page: the Manage page.

  4. Manage page
    • The user may drill down to the Detail page of other objects and each time return to the Manage page.
       
    • The user selects a final page-level action and navigates back to the referring page: the Overview page.

  5. Overview page
    • The user returns to the Overview page.

    Note: For some tasks, users navigate directly from the Overview page to a Detail page and then return to the Overview page.

Figure 11.1. Example of a task flow that begins on a Work Area Overview page
Example 2: Select a Link from the Global Area or Outside the Current Work Area

Figure 9b: Example of a task flow that begins with a link in the Global Area

  1. Global area link on any dashboard or work area page
    • The user selects an object instance in theRecent Items menu and navigates to the corresponding Detail page.
       
  2. Detail page
    • The user views and possibly edits the content.
    • The user selects a final page-level action that navigates to the work area Overview page.

  3. Work Area Entry page
    • The user navigates to the associated Work Area Entry page.

Note: Global links can navigate users to Manage or Detail pages. In either case, selecting a final page-level action navigates users to the associated Work Area Entry page, never to the originating page.

Figure 11.2. Example of a task flow that begins in the global area

11.2  Task Flows in Dynamic Tabs Work Areas

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For detailed information, see the Dynamic Tabs Work Area Guideline.
 
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