Oracle Usable Apps | Applications User Experience Simplicity, mobility, extensibility
   
 
Research Articles
 
Oracle's User Experience professionals present at International Conference
on HCI

At the 13th annual Human Computer Internation International Conference in San Diego, CA, Oracle sent a team of user experience researchers to present and participate in an exchange of scientific information on wide variety of new hot topics on human cognition, online communities, social computing, universal access, simulation, digital modeling, gaming, virtual reality, usability, and information system.




Customer Boards as Vehicles of Change in Enterprise Software User Experience

Abstract:

Traditional user-centered design processes do not leverage long-term customer-vendor relationships as a means of improving product usability. While designing a next-generation applications software suite, Oracle reached out to its most-involved customers for creative solutions to common user-experience issues. The mission of the Oracle Usability Advisory Board was to take enterprise software to a whole new level in usability. The board consisted of executives and senior managers primarily in information technology positions in different types of organizations. The board identified three major areas where it wanted to improve usability: consistency and design, integration and performance, and Web 2.0. Through various working groups, the board has developed tools for obtaining customer feedback on product usability, online seminars on technical topics, and outreach mechanisms to other customers. The board has effectively become Oracle’s partner in ensuring product understanding and use, thus setting the stage for improved usability in the next-generation product.

Citation:

Wichansky, A.M.  (2009), Customer Boards as Vehicles of Change in Enterprise Software User Experience, Paper presented at the Human Computer Interaction International Conference HCII 2009, San Diego, CA, USA

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Crafting Contemporary Enterprise Application User Experiences

Abstract:

This paper outlines the field research program defined by an enterprise application user experience organization designed to collect data from globally distributed corporations. The goal of the research program was to drive the next generation user experience of enterprise applications. This paper discusses the top five lessons learned and their design solutions.

Citation:

Vaughan, M. W. and Ashley, J.  (2009), Crafting Contemporary Enterprise Application User Experiences, Paper presented at the Human Computer Interaction International Conference HCII 2009, San Diego, CA, USA.

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From Research to Product: Integrating Treemaps into Enterprise Software

Abstract:

The difficult journey of introducing a new treemap visualization into enterprise software products is described, highlighting interactions among a research team, product teams, and management. Successful product integration ultimately required multiple iterations of prototyping, review, and redirection, as products were cancelled and modified. Several lessons learned are provided, including the need to build flexible and generic prototypes, cultivate champions, and be tenacious.

Citation:

Goldberg, J.H., Helfman, J.I., and Beresniewicz  (2009), From Research to Product: Integrating Treemaps into Enterprise Software, Paper presented at the Human Computer Interaction International Conference HCII 2009, San Diego, CA, USA

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Designing for the Next Generation: Generation-Y Expectations

Abstract:

In designing applications for the next-generation workforce, we considered the requirements of future workforce members (Generation Y). A study was conducted using a wants and needs analysis to analyze a consumer trend toward the use of social networking tools. A significant proportion of future workforce members expected to see consumer social-networking style features in their enterprise applications. The data highlighted specific requirements that provided some further insight into the expectations of future enterprise application users.

Citation:

Venkatacharya, P., Rice, S., and Bezuayehu , L. (2009). Designing for the Next Generation: Generation–Y Expectations. Paper presented at the Human Computer Interaction International Conference HCII 2009, San Diego, CA, USA

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Estimating Productivity: Composite Operators for Keystroke Level Modeling

Abstract:

Task time is a measure of productivity in an interface. Keystroke Level Modeling (KLM) can predict experienced user task time to within 10 to 30% of actual times. One of the biggest constraints to implementing KLM is the tedious aspect of estimating the low-level motor and cognitive actions of the users. The method proposed here combines common actions in applications into high-level operators (composite operators) that represent the average error-free time (e.g. to click on a button, select from a drop-down, type into a text-box). The combined operators dramatically reduce the amount of time and error in building an estimate of productivity. An empirical test of 26 users across two enterprise web-applications found this method to estimate the mean observed time to within 10%. The composite operators lend themselves to use by designers and product developers early in development without the need for different prototyping environments or tedious calculations.

Citation:

Sauro, J. Estimating Productivity: Composite Operators for Keystroke Level Modeling. Paper presented at the Human Computer Interaction International Conference HCII 2009, San Diego, CA, USA

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The Future of Enterprise Is with the Mobile Workforce: An International Field Study

Abstract:

To create the most effective mobile applications, Oracle must understand how and in what contexts the mobile workforce is using their mobile devices. Oracle mobile researchers went into the workforce population and conducted an international, ethnographic field study to fully understand the mobile worker’s needs, behaviors, and contextually based activities.

Citation:

Rampoldi-Hnilo, L., White, B., and Snyder, M., and Sampanes, C.. The Future of Enterprise Is with the Mobile Workforce: An International Field Study. Paper presented at the Human Computer Interaction International Conference HCII 2009, San Diego, CA, USA

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The Factor Structure of the System Usability Scale

Abstract:

Since its introduction in 1986, the 10-item System Usability Scale (SUS) has been assumed to be unidimensional. Factor analysis of two independent SUS data sets reveals that the SUS actually has two factors – Usable (8 items) and Learnable (2 items – specifically, Items 4 and 10). These new scales have reasonable reliability (coefficient alpha of .91 and .70, respectively). They correlate highly with the overall SUS (r = .985 and .784, respectively) and correlate significantly with one another (r = .664), but at a low enough level to use as separate scales. A sensitivity analysis using data from 19 tests had a significant Test by Scale interaction, providing additional evidence of the differential utility of the new scales. Practitioners can continue to use the current SUS as is, but, at no extra cost, can also take advantage of these new scales to extract additional information from their SUS data. The data support the use of “awkward” rather than “cumbersome” in Item 8.

Citation:

Lewis, J.R., and Sauro, J. The Factor Structure of the System Usability Scale Paper presented at the Human Computer Interaction International Conference HCII 2009, San Diego, CA, USA

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Usability Maturity: A Case Study in Planning and Designing an Enterprise Application Suite

Abstract:

Although user experience professionals look to the user-centered design process (UCD) as the overarching set of principles for the research, design, and testing of usable products that meet customer needs, the application of these principles varies significantly depending on the type and scale of design challenges to be solved and the level of usability maturity that a company practices. This paper describes a case study of how one organization went from a Usability Maturity Model level of Implemented to a level of Integrated while it worked through a design cycle for a large enterprise application suite. This paper also discusses lessons learned along the way.

Citation:

Ashley, J. and Desmond, K.. Usability Maturity: A Case Study in Planning and Designing an Enterprise Application Suite Paper presented at the Human Computer Interaction International Conference HCII 2009, San Diego, CA, USA

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