What You See Is What You Get Element

Hands-On Lab: Using Unified Archives to Deploy an Oracle WebLogic Server Cluster on Oracle Solaris 11.2

by Jie Shen, Lu Wang, and Yu Wang

This lab demonstrates how to leverage Oracle Solaris Unified Archives to accelerate the process of setting up an Oracle WebLogic Server Cluster.


Published March 2015


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Table of Contents
Introduction
Prerequisites
Hardware and Software Requirements
Exercise 0: Check Your Environment (5 Minutes)
Exercise 1: Start the Oracle WebLogic Server Cluster (5 Minutes)
Exercise 2: Create a Unified Archive File (20 Minutes)
Exercise 3: Use the Clone Archive to Create zone03 (15 Minutes)
Exercise 4: Add a New Oracle WebLogic Server Instance to Cluster oowCluster (5 Minutes)
Summary
Appendix: More About Oracle WebLogic Server and Oracle Solaris
See Also
About the Authors

Introduction

Setting up an Oracle WebLogic Server cluster can be a highly time-consuming task. An Oracle WebLogic Server cluster consists of multiple instances of Oracle WebLogic Server running simultaneously and working together to provide increased scalability and reliability. A cluster usually contains many machines on which Oracle WebLogic Server instances running. You have to go through the entire process of installing the operating system and Oracle WebLogic Server on all machines that constitute the cluster.

In this lab, you will learn how to leverage Oracle Solaris Unified Archives to accelerate the process of setting up an Oracle WebLogic Server cluster. You will clone and deploy a virtual machine (an Oracle Solaris non-global zone) from an existing virtual machine (an Oracle Solaris non-global zone) with Oracle WebLogic Server installed, and you will add the new virtual machine to the Oracle WebLogic Server cluster.

Unified Archives is a new feature introduced in Oracle Solaris 11.2. A Unified Archive unifies the archive requirements for Oracle Solaris virtual and physical environments and enables moving to or from Oracle Solaris virtual or physical environments. Virtual environments include Oracle Solaris Zones, Oracle Solaris Kernel Zones, and Oracle VM for SPARC. A Unified Archive file may contain one or more archived instances of Oracle Solaris from a single host.

Note: For more background on Oracle WebLogic Server as well as Unified Archives and other Oracle Solaris technologies used in this lab, see the Appendix.

Prerequisites

This hands-on lab assumes you have a runnable Oracle Solaris 11.2 operating environment configured as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. The required environment

Figure 1. The required environment

Please refer to Table 1 for the Oracle Solaris user accounts and IP addresses configuration, and to Figure 5 for the Oracle WebLogic Server cluster configuration.

Note: Because of limitations on the length of this article, we skip step-by-step instructions for the Oracle Solaris and Oracle WebLogic Server Cluster installation and configuration. Please refer to following resources for more information and detailed instructions.

Hardware and Software Requirements

Ensure your system can meet the following requirements:

  • Memory requirement: 4 GB or more
  • Disk space requirement: 20 GB
  • Operating system: Oracle Solaris 11.2
  • Oracle WebLogic Server 12c (12.1.1)
  • JDK 1.7.0_67

Exercise 0: Check Your Environment (5 Minutes)

In this exercise, you will check the IP address and hosts file configuration in your environment.

Step 1: Start the Oracle Solaris 11.2 Environment

Start Oracle Solaris 11.2, host name globalzone, with two non-global zones running, as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. Environment configuration

Figure 2. Environment configuration

In this Oracle Solaris 11.2 environment, we assume there is an installed Oracle WebLogic Server cluster environment, named oowCluster. On zone01, an Oracle WebLogic Administration Server and two managed Oracle WebLogic Server instances are installed and configured, and on zone02, three managed Oracle WebLogic Server instances are installed and configured.

The goals of this lab are to do the following:

  • Use a clone of zone02 to create a third non-global zone, zone03, with Oracle WebLogic Server installed. To do this, you will use the Oracle Solaris Unified Archives feature to avoid manually installing Oracle Solaris and Oracle WebLogic Server on zone03.
  • Create a new server instance on zone03 and add it to oowCluster.

As you are doing the exercises in this lab, use the usernames and passwords shown in Table 1 to log in to the zones.

Table 1. User account and IP address configuration information
  globalzone zone01 zone02 zone03
Host name: account 1 root/labroot1 root/labroot1 root/labroot1 root/labroot1
Host name: account 2 labuser/labuser1 labuser/labuser1 labuser/labuser1 labuser/labuser1
Host name: account 3   wls/wlsuser1 wls/wlsuser1 wls/wlsuser1
IP address 192.168.1.100 192.168.1.101 192.168.1.102 192.168.1.103
OS type Oracle Solaris 11.2 global zone Oracle Solaris 11.2 non-global zone Oracle Solaris 11.2 non-global zone Oracle Solaris 11.2 non-global zone

Step 2: Check the IP Address Configuration and the hosts File in globalzone

  1. Log in to the globalzone desktop as labuser with password labuser1.
  2. Open a terminal window and check the IP address configuration:

    Note: To open a terminal window, click the terminal icon on the top panel.

    labuser@globalzone:~$ ipadm show-addr
    ADDROBJ           TYPE     STATE        ADDR
    lo0/v4            static   ok           127.0.0.1/8
    net0/v4           static   ok           192.168.1.100/24
    lo0/v6            static   ok           ::1/128
    net0/v6           addrconf ok           fe80::a00:27ff:fe3e:ca4d/10
    
  3. Check the hosts file in globalzone:

    labuser@globalzone:~$ cat /etc/hosts
    #
    # Copyright 2009 Sun Microsystems, Inc.  All rights reserved.
    # Use is subject to license terms.
    #
    # Internet host table
    #
    ::1 globalzone localhost 
    127.0.0.1 globalzone localhost loghost 
    
    192.168.1.100   globalzone
    192.168.1.101   zone01
    192.168.1.102   zone02
    192.168.1.103   zone03
    
  4. Log in to zone01 and then check its IP address and hosts file:

    Note: The first time you use ssh to log in to zone01, the system will ask whether you want to continue connecting. Answer yes.

    labuser@globalzone:~$ ssh wls@zone01
    The authenticity of host 'zone01 (192.168.1.101)' can't be established.
    RSA key fingerprint is a9:e5:36:7c:5e:4b:eb:2b:0d:13:1c:08:92:15:ff:84.
    Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
    Warning: Permanently added 'zone01,192.168.1.101' (RSA) to the list of known hosts.
    Password: 
    Last login: Wed Aug 27 09:45:33 2014
    Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11      11.2    June 2014
    wls@zone01:~$ ipadm show-addr
    wls@zone01:~$ cat /etc/hosts
    
  5. Log in to zone02 and then check its IP address and hosts file:

    Note: The first time you use ssh to log in to zone02, the system will ask whether you want to continue connecting. Answer yes.

    labuser@globalzone:~$ ssh wls@zone02
    The authenticity of host 'zone02 (192.168.1.102)' can't be established.
    RSA key fingerprint is a9:e5:36:7c:5e:4b:eb:2b:0d:13:1c:08:92:15:ff:84.
    Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
    Warning: Permanently added 'zone02,192.168.1.102' (RSA) to the list of known hosts.
    Password: 
    Last login: Wed Aug 27 09:45:33 2014
    Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11      11.2    June 2014
    wls@zone02:~$ ipadm show-addr
    wls@zone02:~$ cat /etc/hosts
    

Exercise 1: Start the Oracle WebLogic Server Cluster (5 Minutes)

In this exercise, you will start the preinstalled Oracle WebLogic Server cluster in zone01 and zone02.

Step 1: Start the Oracle WebLogic Administration Server and Node Manager in zone01

  1. Start the Administration Server in zone01:

    1. Open a terminal window.
    2. Log in to zone01 as wls and use wlsuser1 as the password:

      labuser@globalzone:~$ ssh wls@zone01
      The authenticity of host 'zone01 (192.168.1.101)' can't be established.
      RSA key fingerprint is a9:e5:36:7c:5e:4b:eb:2b:0d:13:1c:08:92:15:ff:84.
      Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
      Warning: Permanently added 'zone01,192.168.1.101' (RSA) to the list of known hosts.
      Password: 
      Last login: Wed Aug 27 09:45:33 2014
      Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11      11.2    June 2014
      
    3. Start the Administration Server in zone01 using the following command:

      wls@zone01:~$ $DOMAIN_HOME/bin/startWebLogic.sh
      

      When Oracle WebLogic Server has started successfully, you will see the following message:

      <Aug 28, 2014 8:27:19 AM PDT> <Notice> <WebLogicServer> <BEA-000365> <Server state changed to RUNNING.> 
      <Aug 28, 2014 8:27:19 AM PDT> <Notice> <WebLogicServer> <BEA-000360> <The server started in RUNNING mode.>
      
    4. Leave the current terminal window open and open a new one.
  2. Start the Node Manager in zone01:

    1. Log in to zone01 using the following ssh command:

      labuser@globalzone:~$ ssh wls@zone01
      Password: 
      Last login: Wed Aug 27 09:45:33 2014
      Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11      11.2    June 2014
      
    2. Start up the Node Manager in zone01:

      wls@zone01:~$ $WL_HOME/server/bin/startNodeManager.sh
      

      The following information indicates Node Manager started successfully.

      <Aug 28, 2014 8:29:18 AM> <INFO> <Plain socket listener started on port 5556>
      Aug 28, 2014 8:29:18 AM weblogic.nodemanager.server.Listener run
      INFO: Plain socket listener started on port 5556
      
    3. Leave the current terminal window open and open a new one.

Step 2: Start the Node Manager in zone02

  1. Open another new terminal window and log in to zone02 using the following ssh command:

    labuser@globalzone:~$ ssh wls@zone02
    Password: 
    Last login: Wed Aug 27 10:02:43 2014
    Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11      11.2    June 2014
    
  2. Start Node Manager in zone02:

    wls@zone02:~$ $WL_HOME/server/bin/startNodeManager.sh
    

    The following information indicates that Node Manager started successfully.

    <Aug 28, 2014 8:35:27 AM> <INFO> <Plain socket listener started on port 5556>
    Aug 28, 2014 8:35:27 AM weblogic.nodemanager.server.Listener run
    INFO: Plain socket listener started on port 5556
    
  3. Leave the current terminal window open and open a new one.

Step 3: Start the Oracle WebLogic Server Cluster

  1. Start the Firefox web browser from globalzone.

    Figure 3. Starting Firefox

    Figure 3. Starting Firefox

  2. Log in to the console of the Oracle WebLogic Server cluster by using the following URL and then entering weblogic as the username and labuser1 as the password:

    zone01:7001/console
    

    Figure 4. Logging in to the Oracle WebLogic Server cluster

    Figure 4. Logging in to the Oracle WebLogic Server cluster

  3. Click Environment > Servers.

    Six server instances should be shown in a cluster named oowCluster, and all the server instances should be in the SHUTDOWN state.

    Figure 5. Viewing the six Oracle WebLogic Server instances in the cluster

    Figure 5. Viewing the six Oracle WebLogic Server instances in the cluster

  4. Start all the server instances:

    1. Click Environment > Servers > Control.
    2. Choose the instances you want to start, and then click the Start button.

      Figure 6. Starting all the server instances

      Figure 6. Starting all the server instances

      After each instance has been started, its state becomes STARTING.

      Figure 7. Checking the state of the server instances

      Figure 7. Checking the state of the server instances

  5. Check the server instances' health state by clicking Configuration. Their health should be shown as OK.

    Figure 8. Checking the health of the server instances

    Figure 8. Checking the health of the server instances

Exercise 2: Create a Unified Archive File (20 Minutes)

In this exercise, you will create a Unified Archive file of zone02.

Step 1: Set the Oracle Solaris Image Packaging System Repository for the System

To get ready for zone installation, set the publisher of the IPS package repository to a local repository, as follows.

  1. Open a new terminal window and become root in globalzone.
  2. Set the publisher of the package repository by running the following command:

    root@globalzone:~# pkg set-publisher -G '*' -g /media/SOL-11_2_REPO_42/repo/ solaris

    In the command above:

    • solaris is the name of the default package publisher.
    • -G '*' removes all existing origins for the solaris publisher.
    • -g specifies the URI of a local repository to add as the new origin for the solaris publisher.
  3. Verify that your publisher has been changed:

    root@globalzone:~# pkg publisher
    PUBLISHER                   TYPE     STATUS P LOCATION
    solaris                     origin   online F file:///media/SOL-11_2_REPO_42/repo/
    
  4. To make sure your repository works properly, run the following command:

    root@globalzone:~# pkg search -r developer/vala
    INDEX       ACTION VALUE                                 PACKAGE
    incorporate depend developer/vala@0.8.1-0.175.2.0.0.27.0 pkg:/consolidation/desktop/gnome-incorporation@0.5.11-0.175.2.0.0.42.0
    require     depend developer/vala@0.8.1-0.175.2.0.0.22.0 pkg:/desktop/file-manager/gnome-commander@1.2.8.8-0.175.2.0.0.24.0
    pkg.fmri    set    solaris/developer/vala                pkg:/developer/vala@0.8.1-0.175.2.0.0.27.0
    

    The results shown above indicate that your repository is ready to use.

Step 2: Create a Clone Archive File of zone02

  1. Open a new terminal window and run the following command to become root to acquire superuser privileges.

    labuser@globalzone:~$ su -
    Password: 
    Oracle Corporation	SunOS 5.11	11.2	June 2014
    root@globalzone:~#
    
  2. Create a ZFS file system to accommodate the archive file.

    root@globalzone:~# zfs create -o mountpoint=/export/dat rpool/dat
    root@globalzone:~# zfs list | grep dat
    rpool/dat                                                    38.5K  84.9G  38.5K  /export/dat
    root@globalzone:~#
    
  3. Create an archive file called z02.uar that includes only zone02:

    root@globalzone:~# archiveadm create -z zone02 -e -s /export/dat/z02.uar
    Initializing Unified Archive creation resources...
    Unified Archive initialized: /export/dat/z02.uar
    Logging to: /system/volatile/archive_log.5538
    Executing dataset discovery...
    Dataset discovery complete
    Preparing archive system image...
    Beginning archive stream creation...
    Archive stream creation complete
    Beginning final archive assembly...
    Archive creation complete
    

    In the command above:

    • The -z option specifies which zone(s) to archive.
    • The -e option indicates to skip creating automate installation media.
    • The -s option indicates to skip the capacity check.

    This command will take several minutes to complete.

  4. Check the file size of z02.uar:

    root@globalzone:~# ls -lh /export/dat/z02.uar
    -rw-r--r--   1 root     root        922M Aug 28 09:19 /export/dat/z02.uar
    root@globalzone:~#
    

Step 3: Verify the Contents of the Clone Archive

Use the archiveadm info command to verify the contents of the z02.uar archive. The -v option specifies verbose output.

root@globalzone:~# archiveadm info -v /export/dat/z02.uar
Archive Information
          Creation Time:  2014-08-28T16:11:21Z
            Source Host:  globalzone
           Architecture:  i386
       Operating System:  Oracle Solaris 11.2 X86
       Recovery Archive:  No
              Unique ID:  40ae0d01-b2dd-c515-9876-f54c31087275
        Archive Version:  1.0
Deployable Systems
          'zone02'
             OS Version:  0.5.11
              OS Branch:  0.175.2.0.0.42.2
              Active BE:  solaris-0
                  Brand:  solaris
            Size Needed:  1.7GB
              Unique ID:  c4e59f8a-7a7d-6c55-acf2-aa5dec2701cb
              Root-only:  Yes

Note: The value shown for Unique ID in the sample output above will be different from your value.

Exercise 3: Use the Clone Archive to Create zone03 (15 Minutes)

In this exercise, you will deploy a new zone using the archive file z02.uar.

Step 1: Create zone03

  1. Become root in globalzone.
  2. Use the following command to create zone03 by using the zone02 configuration specified in the z02.uar file as a template:

    root@globalzone:~# zonecfg -z zone03 create -a /export/dat/z02.uar -z zone02
    root@globalzone:~#
    
  3. Check the configuration of zone03:

    root@globalzone:~# zonecfg -z zone03 info
    zonename: zone03
    zonepath: /system/zones/zone03
    brand: solaris
    autoboot: true
    autoshutdown: shutdown
    bootargs: -m verbose
    file-mac-profile: 
    pool: 
    limitpriv: 
    scheduling-class: 
    ip-type: exclusive
    hostid: 
    tenant: 
    fs-allowed: 
    anet:
       linkname: net0
       lower-link: auto
       allowed-address not specified
       configure-allowed-address: true
       defrouter not specified
       allowed-dhcp-cids not specified
       link-protection: mac-nospoof
       mac-address: auto
       mac-prefix not specified
       mac-slot not specified
       vlan-id not specified
       priority not specified
       rxrings not specified
       txrings not specified
       mtu not specified
       maxbw not specified
       rxfanout not specified
       vsi-typeid not specified
       vsi-vers not specified
       vsi-mgrid not specified
       etsbw-lcl not specified
       cos not specified
       pkey not specified
       linkmode not specified
       evs not specified
       vport not specified
    

Step 2: Create a System Configuration Profile for zone03

The sysconfig utility is the interface for unconfiguring and reconfiguring an Oracle Solaris instance.

To automate the system configuration process for zone03, use the following steps to generate a system configuration profile in a directory named zone03-profile.

  1. Run the following command to start the sysconfig utility:

    root@globalzone:~# sysconfig create-profile -o /export/dat/zone03-profile
    

    Figure 9. Initial screen of the sysconfig utility1

    Figure 9. Initial screen of the sysconfig utility

  2. Enter a name for the computer.

    Figure 10. Entering a name for the computer

    Figure 10. Entering a name for the computer

  3. Choose Manually to configure the wired Ethernet connection manually.

    Figure 11. Specifying that the wired Ethernet connection will be configured manually

    Figure 11. Specifying that the wired Ethernet connection will be configured manually

  4. Enter the network configuration information.

    Figure 12. Entering the network configuration information

    Figure 12. Entering the network configuration information

  5. Choose Do not configure DNS.

    Figure 13. Specifying to not configure DNS

    Figure 13. Specifying to not configure DNS

  6. Choose None for the name service.

    Figure 14. Specifying the name service

    Figure 14. Specifying the name service

  7. Choose the appropriate time zone region.

    Figure 15. Choosing the time zone region

    Figure 15. Choosing the time zone region

  8. Choose the appropriate time zone location.

    Figure 16. Choosing the time zone location

    Figure 16. Choosing the time zone location

  9. Choose the appropriate time zone.

    Figure 17. Choosing the time zone

    Figure 17. Choosing the time zone

  10. Choose the appropriate language.

    Figure 18. Choosing the language

    Figure 18. Choosing the language

  11. Choose the appropriate language territory.

    Figure 19. Choosing the language territory

    Figure 19. Choosing the language territory

  12. Choose the appropriate keyboard.

    Figure 20. Choosing the keyboard

    Figure 20. Choosing the keyboard

  13. Specify a root password for the system, and set up a user account with labuser as the username and password as the user password.

    Figure 21. Specifying the user information

    Figure 21. Specifying the user information

  14. (Optional) Provide your My Oracle Support credentials.

    Figure 22. Providing My Oracle Support credentials

    Figure 22. Providing My Oracle Support credentials

  15. Choose No proxy.

    Figure 23. Choosing not to specify a proxy

    Figure 23. Choosing not to specify a proxy

  16. Review all the settings to ensure they are correct.

    Figure 24. Reviewing the settings to ensure they are correct

    Figure 24. Reviewing the settings to ensure they are correct

  17. Press F2 to apply the settings.

    The following information indicates the successful generation of the zone03 profile.

    SC profile successfully generated as:
    /export/dat/zone03-profile/sc_profile.xml
    
    Exiting System Configuration Tool. Log is available at:
    /system/volatile/sysconfig/sysconfig.log.11081
    root@globalzone:~#
    

Step 3: Install (Clone) zone03 from the z02.uar Archive

  1. Change the working directory by running the following command:

    root@globalzone:~# cd /export/dat
    root@globalzone:/export/dat#
    
  2. Run the following command to install zone03 from the archive file, which might take a few minutes:

    root@globalzone:/export/dat# zoneadm -z zone03 install -c zone03-profile/sc_profile.xml -a z02.uar -z zone02 
    

    In the command above:

    • The first -z specifies the name of the target zone.
    • -c specifies the name of the system configuration file of the zone to be installed.
    • -a specifies the name of the Unified Archive file.
    • The second -z specifies which zone to clone from z02.uar, because a single Unified Archive may contain multiple zones.

    The following output indicates zone03 was installed successfully.

    Updating non-global zone: Zone updated.
                        Result: Attach Succeeded.
    
            Done: Installation completed in 126.756 seconds.
      Next Steps: Boot the zone, then log into the zone console (zlogin -C)
                  to complete the configuration process.
    Log saved in non-global zone as /system/zones/zone03/root/var/log/zones/zoneadm.20140827T074118Z.zone03.install
    
  3. Boot up zone03.

    root@globalzone:/export/dat# zoneadm -z zone03 boot
    root@globalzone:/export/dat#
    
  4. Log in to the console of zone03 to see the process of the first boot, which may take a few minutes.

    root@globalzone:/export/dat# zlogin -C zone03
    

    The following message indicates zone03 has booted up.

    zone03 console login:
    

Exercise 4: Add a New Oracle WebLogic Server Instance to Cluster oowCluster (5 Minutes)

In this exercise, you will create a new Oracle WebLogic Server instance on zone03 and add it to the oowCluster cluster.

Step 1: Start Node Manager on zone03

  1. Log in to zone03 as wls using wlsuser1 for the password:

    zone03 console login: wls
    Password: 
    Last login: Wed Aug 27 09:45:33 2014
    Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11      11.2    June 2014
    
  2. Start up Node Manager in zone03:

    wls@zone03:~$ $WL_HOME/server/bin/startNodeManager.sh
    

    The following output indicates Node Manager started.

    <Aug 28, 2014 11:03:28 AM> <INFO> <Plain socket listener started on port 5556>
    Aug 28, 2014 11:03:28 AM weblogic.nodemanager.server.Listener run
    INFO: Plain socket listener started on port 5556
    
  3. Keep the terminal window open.

Step 2: Add zone03 as a New Machine and Add a New Server Instance

  1. Open a browser from globalzone.
  2. Log in to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console using the following URL:

    http://zone01:7001/console 
    
  3. Select Environments > Machines, and then click New.

    Figure 25. Adding a new machine

    Figure 25. Adding a new machine

  4. To add zone03 as a new machine, do the following:

    1. Enter Machine-2 in the Name field.
    2. Select Unix from the Machine OS list.
    3. Click Next.

      Figure 26. Starting to add zone3 as a new machine

      Figure 26. Starting to add zone3 as a new machine

    4. Select Plain from the Type list.
    5. Enter zone03 as the host name in the Listen Address field.
    6. Click Finish.

      Figure 27. Specifying the rest of the parameters for the new machine

      Figure 27. Specifying the rest of the parameters for the new machine

  5. Select Environment > Machines > Machine-2 and confirm that Machine-2 was successfully added.

    Figure 28. Verifying that the new machine was added

    Figure 28. Verifying that the new machine was added

  6. Select Monitoring > Node Manager and verify that the Status is shown as Reachable.

    Figure 29. Checking the status of the new machine

    Figure 29. Checking the status of the new machine

  7. Add a new Oracle WebLogic Server instance to the oowCluster cluster and bind it to Machine-2:

    1. Select Servers > New to start the creation of a new server instance.

      Figure 30. Starting to add a new Oracle WebLogic Server instance

      Figure 30. Starting to add a new Oracle WebLogic Server instance

    2. Enter Server03-1 in the Server Name field.
    3. Enter 7003 in the Server Listen Port field.
    4. Select oowCluster from the Select a Cluster list.
    5. Click Next to see the basic information for the new server instance.

      Figure 31. Specifying information for the new server instance

      Figure 31. Specifying information for the new server instance

    6. If all the information is correct, click Finish.

      Figure 32. Finishing the creation of the new server instance

      Figure 32. Finishing the creation of the new server instance

  8. Bind the new server instance to Machine-2:

    1. Select Servers > Server03-1 to start the process for binding the new server instance to Machine-2.

      Figure 33. Starting the process of binding the new server instance to the new machine

      Figure 33. Starting the process of binding the new server instance to the new machine

    2. Select Machine-2 from the Machine list.
    3. Select oowCluster from the Cluster list.
    4. Click Save to complete the bind operation.

      Figure 34. Completing the binding operation

      Figure 34. Completing the binding operation

  9. Start up the new Oracle WebLogic Server instance:

    1. Select Servers > Control to see a list of the server instances.

      Figure 35. Completing the binding operation

      Figure 35. Displaying the list of server instances

    2. Select Server03-1, and click Start.

      Figure 36. Starting the new server instance

      Figure 36. Starting the new server instance

    3. Refresh the page, and verify that the state of Server03-1 is RUNNING.

      Figure 37. Verifying that the new server instance is running

      Figure 37. Verifying that the new server instance is running

    4. Click Configuration and verify that the health status of Server03-1 is OK.

      Figure 38. Checking the health of the new server instance

      Figure 38. Checking the health of the new server instance

Summary

Congratulations! You completed this lab successfully.

In this lab, you experienced how quickly you can clone and deploy an Oracle WebLogic Server node by leveraging the Unified Archive feature of Oracle Solaris. Unified Archives are very flexible and can be used for performing "any system to any system" migrations, which means both the source system and the target system can be either a physical or virtualized platform. You can accomplish physical-to-virtual (P2V) cloning and virtual-to-physical (V2P) cloning using this feature.

In real-world large-scale deployments, you can benefit even more by using this feature with the Oracle Solaris Automated Installer. Unified Archives can be also used as a means for system recovery.

Appendix: More About Oracle WebLogic Server and Oracle Solaris

What Is an Oracle WebLogic Server Cluster?

An Oracle WebLogic Server cluster consists of multiple Oracle WebLogic Server instances running simultaneously and working together to provide increased scalability and reliability. A cluster appears to clients to be a single Oracle WebLogic Server instance. The server instances that constitute a cluster can run on the same machine, or they can be located on different machines. You can increase a cluster's capacity by adding additional server instances to the cluster on an existing machine, or you can add machines to the cluster to host the incremental server instances. Each server instance in a cluster must run the same version of Oracle WebLogic Server.

What Are Unified Archives?

Unified Archives are a new native archive type for Oracle Solaris. Unified Archives enable multiple system instances to be archived in a single, unified file format. Unified Archives may contain one or more archived instances of Oracle Solaris from a single host. You can select individual installed zones to include during archive creation; including the host system itself is optional.

You can deploy Unified Archives to recover a system that needs to be replaced due to failure, duplicate or clone a system configuration that you want to install on multiple machines, or migrate an existing system to new hardware or to a virtual system. You can deploy archives using any of the following methods:

  • Oracle Solaris Automated Installer
  • Oracle Solaris Zones utilities
  • Unified Archive bootable media

A Unified Archive type is a collection of archive attributes that serve a common use case. The two types of Unified Archive are clone and recovery.

Both clone archives and recovery archives are created and managed by using the archiveadm command. This command enables you to select which zones are to be included in or excluded from an archive, as well as allowing for the exclusion of ZFS data sets.

By default, an archive includes all data sets associated with the selected zones, unless they are specifically excluded during the archive creation process. For a non-global zone, the archive will contain the zone's boot environment data sets and all delegated data sets assigned to it. For a global zone, the boot environment data sets are archived as well as all data sets not associated with a zone. Note that the process includes all top-down pools. Any number of data sets may be excluded from the archive.

What Is Oracle Solaris ZFS?

Oracle Solaris ZFS is a revolutionary file system that changes the way file systems are administered, and it has features and benefits not found in any other file system available today. ZFS is robust, scalable, and easy to administer.

ZFS is a combined file system and logical volume manager. The features of ZFS include protection against data corruption, support for high storage capacities, efficient data compression, integration of the concepts of file system and volume management, snapshots and copy-on-write clones, continuous integrity checking, and automatic repair and RAID-Z support.

What Is an Oracle Solaris Zone?

The Oracle Solaris Zones partitioning technology is used to virtualize operating system services and provide an isolated and secure environment for running applications. A non-global zone, often referred to as a zone, is a virtualized operating system environment created within a single instance of the Oracle Solaris operating system. The instance of the operating system is in a zone called the global zone.

When you create a zone, you produce an application execution environment in which processes are isolated from the rest of the system. This isolation prevents processes that are running in one zone from monitoring or affecting processes that are running in other zones. Even a process running with root credentials cannot view or affect activity in other zones. You can use Oracle Solaris Zones to maintain the one-application-per-server deployment model while simultaneously sharing hardware resources.

Oracle Solaris Zones let you separate one application from others on the same OS, allowing you to create isolated environments where users can log in and do what they want without affecting anything outside that zone. In addition, Oracle Solaris Zones also are secure from external attacks and internal malicious programs. Each Oracle Solaris Zone contains a complete resource-controlled environment that allows you to allocate resources such as CPU, memory, networking components, and storage.

Administrators can choose to closely manage all the Oracle Solaris Zones or they can assign rights to other administrators for specific Oracle Solaris Zones. This flexibility lets you tailor an entire computing environment to the needs of a particular application, all within the same OS.

Oracle Solaris 11.2 has integrated deployment support for Unified Archives, and both the Oracle Solaris zonecfg and zoneadm commands natively support Unified Archives.

The zonecfg command is used to configure a non-global zone. The following operations can be performed using this command:

  • Create the zone configuration.
  • Verify that all required information is present.
  • Commit the non-global zone configuration.

The zoneadm command is the primary tool used to install and administer non-global zones. Operations using the zoneadm command must be run from the global zone. In this lab, we use the zoneadm command to accomplish the following tasks.

  • Install a zone.
  • Boot a zone.

After you configure a zone, install the zone, and boot the zone, the zlogin command is used to log in to the zone.

What Is the Image Packaging System?

The Oracle Solaris Image Packaging System (IPS) is a framework that enables you to list and search for software packages, install and remove software, and upgrade to a new Oracle Solaris release. IPS commands enable you to restrict which packages can be installed or which versions of packages can be installed.

Oracle Solaris 11.2 software is distributed in IPS packages. IPS packages are stored in IPS package repositories, which are populated by IPS publishers. Software developers, or publishers, make their software available in software package repositories that administrators can install to their systems. IPS packages are installed into Oracle Solaris 11 images. A subset of the capabilities that are available through the IPS command-line interface is available through the Package Manager graphical user interface. Administrators can install and update software from local or remote software package repositories.

Oracle Solaris 11 installations are configured to have a default publisher, solaris, which supplies software packages from the Oracle Solaris release repository at http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release.

See Also

About the Authors

Jie Shen is a senior software engineer in the Oracle Systems group who has specialized in Oracle Solaris application performance tuning and porting for over 10 years. He works with large independent software vendors (ISVs) to make their software run optimally on Oracle Solaris and Oracle's SPARC servers. In recent years, he has also focused on cloud computing solutions based on Oracle technologies.

Lu Wang is a technical consultant in Oracle's ISV Engineering group. Her responsibilities include providing technical support to ISVs and evangelizing about and consulting on Oracle Solaris and Oracle's system-related technologies.

Yu Wang presently works as a Java technology engineer and architect consultant for Oracle's ISV Engineering group and focuses on Oracle Solaris and Java. His duties include supporting ISVs and evangelizing about and consulting on Oracle Solaris and Java technologies.

Revision 1.0, 03/18/2015

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