Data Visualization for HR

Data Visualization

Data Visualization:
Helping Businesses Build
A Better Workplace

Takin Babaei, Product Marketing Director,
Business Analytics, Oracle @takin_ba


Visual analytics enable businesses to get more value out of employee data and create a workplace that attracts the top talent

Intel

We spend more time with our colleagues than we do our own families but often what we know about those colleagues and particularly what companies know about their employees runs to little more than their job description, contact details and payroll information.

But increasingly, top performing organizations are recognizing the benefits of understanding more about their employees through analytics. This is emphatically not about checking up on them. It’s about ensuring they are fully valued, recognized and utilized as effectively as possible. It is also about ensuring the workplace is nurturing, progressive, responsible and accountable.

Takin Babaei

Takin Babaei, Product Marketing Director, Business Analytics

Finding top talent can prove tricky and retaining them can prove even trickier. As such, leaving employee satisfaction, development and engagement to chance or simply trying to cut corners in building an employer brand is a risky approach. And organizations tackling these business challenges without analytics will be severely limited.

Furthermore, the amount of data available to organizations about their workforce is extensive, from personal information such as age, gender, educational background and professionals skills and qualifications, to unstructured data such as surveys, clickstreams, employee and manager feedback. Employees create data every time they file expenses or fill in timesheets, do overtime or log onto  HR portals, get a pay rise or take on a new role and take holiday or sick leave.

Pretty much everything we do during our careers has the potential to become useful information.  But often employers have either not captured that information, or if they have, have done little with it. Indeed, in a Global Human Capital Trends survey of over 3,300 business and HR leaders, Deloitte and Oracle discovered that disjointed HR systems are a problem for more than 60 percent of companies.

 Big data and visual analytics give employers the resources they need to explore workforce trends, investigate the root cause of issues, and maintain a workforce strategy that delivers quantifiable business impact. 

Yet big data and visual analytics give employers the resources they need to explore workforce trends, investigate the root cause of issues, and maintain a workforce strategy that delivers quantifiable business impact.

Take wellbeing initiatives for example, such as gym membership, cycle to work schemes or yoga classes. These are all sensible perks to offer a modern workforce, but while most businesses could probably report sign-up rates, how many could say how effective those initiatives really are? To do that requires the analysis of sign-up and participation data in the context of other data, such as levels of sick leave and churn, both of which should go down, and employee satisfaction, which should go up.

Importantly, data visualization makes analysis based on multiple data sources easily available to a wide range of users, regardless of their technical competence. Oracle’s Data Visualization Cloud Service, for example, can enable manipulation and blending of data in Excel files or in the cloud via a web browser, giving any level of HR employee a much clearer understanding of their information. Detailed visual analytics can be used in standalone dashboards or integrated into business applications used as part of the general HR workload. This additional ability to extend the reach and power of data visualization is something highlighted in our recent industry expert webcast, featuring comments from Gartner.

 The goal with this level of data analysis isn’t to create more work for people; it’s to create a better workplace for everybody. 

Through visual analysis of workforce data, businesses are able to quickly and reliably learn a great deal about their people. Organizations are also able to get away from gut instinct to see whether the right employees are being rewarded in the right way, or at the right time. They can analyze whether benefits are taken advantage of – and by which groups within the workforce – and refresh them if necessary to attract or retain particular groups. They can better recognize if employees are encountering problems or if their skills are not being used effectively, or if pockets of the business display more concerning patterns of churn than others.

The Dow Chemical Company has embraced this level of workforce analytics. With 45,000 employees across 160 countries, with 5,000 line managers, technology is crucial to making sense of the distributed, highly skilled, highly specialized workforce. By exploiting the power of visual analytics the company’s business leaders are able to proactively identify potential issues, address them before they become problems and ensure they have the right resources when and where needed.

By putting detailed information into the hands of not only the HR department, but all HR decision-makers, such as line managers and even the board, organizations can become far more proactive. Everything from planning training courses to accurately assessing individual performance becomes grounded in genuine, actionable insights.

The goal with this level of data analysis isn’t to create more work for people; it’s to create a better workplace for everybody.

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