How to Automate the Installation and Setup of Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0

On Oracle Solaris 11

by Lucia Lai

How to leverage the Oracle Solaris 11 Automated Installer to automate the installation and configuration of an Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0 cluster.


Published September 2012

Introduction
Prerequisites and Overview of the Process
Setting Up the AI Install Server
Customizing the Automated Cluster Installation and Configuration
Installing and Configuring the ISC DHCP Server
Installing and Configuring the Cluster Nodes
Additional Tasks
See Also
About the Author

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Introduction

This article describes how to take advantage of the Automated Installer (AI) in Oracle Solaris 11 to install and configure Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0.

Without the AI, you would have to manually install the cluster components on the cluster nodes, and then run the scinstall tool to add the nodes to the cluster. If, instead, you use the AI, both the Oracle Solaris 11 and the Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0 packages are installed onto the cluster nodes directly from Image Packaging System (IPS) repositories, and the nodes are booted into a new cluster with minimum user intervention.

Note: Currently, only cluster nodes that use IPv4 addressing can be configured using the automated installation method. No nodes can use IPv6 addressing. If any node uses an IPv6 address, use the standard (manual) IPS installation method instead of the automated process described in this article.

Prerequisites and Overview of the Process

The Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0 automated installation process provides "hands-free" network installation and configuration of a cluster. Figure 1 shows the components and high-level actions involved in the automated installation process.

Figure 1

Figure 1. Components and Actions Involved During the Automated Installation

AI Install Server

The AI install server must be a separate system that is distinct from the cluster nodes, and the AI install server must be on the same subnet as the cluster nodes.

The standard cluster configuration tool, scinstall, is in the Oracle Solaris Cluster IPS package, ha-cluster/system/install. You install only this package—no other cluster group packages—on the designated AI install server.

Then you run scinstall and provide information for the installation parameters and cluster configuration. The installation parameters describe the software publishers, the origins of the repositories, and the cluster components to be installed. At the end, scinstall creates an install service that includes an AI manifest file and a system configuration profile for each cluster node. It also prints a message that describes the DHCP configuration, the AI install server, and a boot file for each node. You use this information to set up the DHCP server.

The scinstall utility calls installadm, which is an Oracle Solaris command for managing AI install services. You can use installadm to check the install service created by scinstall for the cluster or do further customization, such as updating the manifest file of the install service.

Ensure that the AI install server meets the following hardware requirements:

  • Memory: A minimum of 1 GB is required.
  • Disk space: One install service is created for all the nodes in a cluster. The install service includes a boot image ISO file, which takes approximately 300 to 400 MB.

Ensure that the AI install server meets the following software requirements:

  • Operating system: The server must run Oracle Solaris 11.
  • Static IP address: The server must be configured with a static IP address.
  • Default router: Verify that the server has a default route set by using the netstat command to show the network status. If the server does not have a default route set by discovery, you can set a static default route by populating the /etc/defaultrouter file with the IP address of a router on your server's network.
  • Multicast DNS: Use the svcs command to check the status of the svc:/network/dns/multicast Oracle Solaris Service Management Facility (SMF) service. If necessary, use the svcadm command to enable the service.

    # svcs /network/dns/multicast
    STATE         STIME    FMRI
    disabled      10:19:28 svc:/network/dns/multicast:default
    # svcadm enable /network/dns/multicast
    # svcs /network/dns/multicast
    STATE         STIME    FMRI
    online        13:28:30 svc:/network/dns/multicast:default
    

DHCP Server

The DHCP server can be a separate server or the same as the AI install server. You use the output of the scinstall command (for example, the boot file information for each node) to configure the DHCP server. Then, when the cluster nodes boot from the network, the settings specified in the DHCP server configuration enable the cluster nodes to find the right install server and boot file to conduct the installation.

In this article, the Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) DHCP server implementation, which is available in Oracle Solaris 11, is used for the examples.

Repositories

The repositories can be either HTTP-based internet repositories or local package repositories.

Note:

  • When you use an internet repository for automated installation, an HTTPS-based repository is not supported. This is because, currently, the actual SSL public key and certificate files imposed by HTTPS for the cluster nodes are not included in the AI boot image ISO file that is released with the Oracle Solaris product.
  • When you use a local package repository, the local repository must be made accessible to the cluster nodes and the AI install server with /net/hosts as an auto-mount point.

The Oracle Solaris 11 and Oracle Solaris Cluster software is published into IPS package repositories. Each repository has a publisher. For example, solaris is the publisher of the Oracle Solaris 11 release repository located at http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release.

When you execute scinstall, it prompts you to specify the publishers and the repository locations. It then lists the group packages that are available in the Oracle Solaris Cluster repository. This information is included in the AI manifest files that are created by scinstall.

When the nodes boot from the network, the AI installation program reads the AI manifest files, and the packages are directly installed from the repository servers onto the cluster nodes.

Cluster Nodes

Before you start the cluster installation, you need to ensure that the cluster nodes' hardware components are supported and that the hardware configuration has been set up properly, including the shared storage and the network interfaces that are used as private interconnects among the cluster nodes.

The cluster nodes must meet the following requirements in order to be AI installation clients:

  • Memory: A minimum of 1 GB is required.
  • Disk space: A minimum of 13 GB is required.
  • Network: During the installation, the cluster nodes require network access to the AI install server, the DHCP server, and the Oracle Solaris and Oracle Solaris Cluster IPS repositories. The cluster nodes must use static IP addressing.
  • Firmware (SPARC clients only): The firmware on SPARC clients must be updated to include the current version of the OpenBoot PROM (OBP), which contains the latest WAN boot support.
  • WAN boot (SPARC clients only): SPARC clients must support WAN boot.

After the AI install service is created and you configure the DHCP server, the only thing you need to perform on the cluster nodes is to boot them from the network to start the installation. When the installation is complete, the nodes are configured into the cluster during two automated reboots.

Note: Currently, only cluster nodes that use IPv4 addressing can be configured using the automated installation method. No nodes can use IPv6 addressing. If any node uses an IPv6 address, use the standard (manual) IPS installation method instead of the automated installation process described in this article.

When you boot a cluster node that is being installed from the network, the following high-level actions occur:

  • The boot process broadcasts a "discover message" that contains the node's MAC address.
  • The DHCP server receives the message, consults its network configuration tables using the node's MAC address, and retrieves the corresponding DHCP definition, which provides the AI install server and boot file information.
  • The cluster node sends a request that contains the its attributes, such as its MAC address, to the AI install server.
  • The AI install server identifies an install service that matches the node's attributes.
  • The AI install server provides to the node a boot program that gets the boot_archive file and loads Oracle Solaris.
  • The AI manifest file and system configuration profile get copied onto the cluster node. The AI installs IPS packages from the IPS repositories that are specified in the AI manifest file.
  • Right after the installation is completed, the cluster node automatically reboots twice. The first reboot is to boot into the newly installed boot environment (BE), which configures the node based on the system configuration profile, including the root user, network, and name services. The second reboot adds the node as an active cluster member.

Setting Up the AI Install Server

To set up the AI install server, you configure the IPS repositories and publishers and then you install the Oracle Solaris Cluster automated installation support package, ha-cluster/system/install.

Configuring the IPS Repositories and Publishers

To install the ha-cluster/system/install package on the AI install server, the AI install server must have access to both an Oracle Solaris 11 IPS package repository and an Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0 repository. You can use an Oracle Solaris Cluster repository that is hosted on http://pkg.oracle.com or you can use a local package repository.

To use an Oracle Solaris Cluster repository hosted on http://pkg.oracle.com and obtain the required SSL public and private keys, perform the following steps. Steps for using a local repository are provided after this procedure.

  1. Go to https://pkg-register.oracle.com.
  2. Choose the Oracle Solaris Cluster Release or Support repository.
  3. Accept the license.
  4. Request a new certificate by choosing the Oracle Solaris Cluster software and submitting a request.

    A certification page is displayed with download buttons for the key and the certificate.

  5. Download the key file and the certificate file and install them as described in the certification page.
  6. Configure the ha-cluster publisher with the downloaded SSL keys to point to the selected repository URL on pkg.oracle.com.

    This following example uses the release repository. The -k option specifies the SSL key file; the -c option specifies the SSL certificate file; the -g option specifies the origin of the repository in URL format; and ha-cluster specifies the publisher name for this repository.

    # pkg set-publisher \
    -k /var/pkg/ssl/Oracle_Solaris_Cluster_4.0.key.pem \
    -c /var/pkg/ssl/Oracle_Solaris_Cluster_4.0.certificate.pem \
    -g https://pkg.oracle.com/ha-cluster/release/ ha-cluster
    

The Oracle Solaris 11 support repository can be set up using steps similar to the steps above. However, the Oracle Solaris 11 release repository does not need SSL keys, and it can be directly accessed via HTTP:

# pkg set-publisher -g http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release solaris

To use a local Oracle Solaris Cluster package repository, download the repository image by performing the following steps:

  1. Download the repository image from one of these sites:

  2. Mount the repository image and copy the data to a shared file system that the AI install server can access:

    # gunzip /tmp/osc4.0-repo-full.iso.gz
    # lofiadm -a /tmp/osc4.0-repo-full.iso /dev/lofi/1
    # mount -F hsfs /dev/lofi/1 /mnt
    # rsync -aP /mnt/repo /export
    # share /export/repo
    
  3. Configure the ha-cluster publisher for this local repository.

    This example uses myrepositoryserver as the system that shares the local copy of the repository:

    # pkg set-publisher -g file:///net/myrepositoryserver/export/repo ha-cluster
    

A local Oracle Solaris 11 repository can be set up using similar steps:

  1. Download the repository image from the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud (production download; login required) at http://edelivery.oracle.com/, except this time select the Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 Media Pack.
  2. Mount the repository image and copy the data to a shared file system that the AI install server can access:

    # lofiadm -a /tmp/V28916-01.iso /dev/lofi/2
    # mount -F hsfs /dev/lofi/2 /solaris_mnt
    # rsync -aP /solaris_mnt/repo /solaris_export
    # share /solaris_export/repo
    
  3. Configure the solaris publisher for this local repository.

    # pkg set-publisher -g file:///net/myrepositoryserver/solaris_export/repo solaris
    

Installing the Oracle Solaris Cluster Automated Installation Support Package

On the AI install server, you need to make sure the publishers for both the Oracle Solaris 11 and Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0 repositories are set up properly. If the publisher of either repository is not set up properly, installation of the ha-cluster/system/install package will fail.

The ha-cluster/system/install package has a dependency on the Oracle Solaris automated install tool package, install/installadm. If the install/installadm package is not yet installed on the AI install server, installing the ha-cluster/system/install package will also install the install/installadm package.

Perform the following procedure:

  1. Use the pkg list command to check whether the ha-cluster/system/install package is already installed:

    # pkg list ha-cluster/system/install
    pkg list: no packages matching 'ha-cluster/system/install' installed
    

    When the publishers are set up for the Oracle Solaris and Oracle Solaris Cluster repositories, use the -a option to the pkg list command to check if the repository contains the ha-cluster/system/install package.

  2. If the package is not yet installed, use the pkg install command to install the package, as shown in Listing 1.

    # pkg publisher
    PUBLISHER              TYPE     STATUS   URI
    solaris                origin   online   https://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release
    ha-cluster             origin   online   https://pkg.oracle.com/ha-cluster/release
    
    # pkg list -a ha-cluster/system/install
    NAME (PUBLISHER)                                  VERSION            IFO
    ha-cluster/system/install (ha-cluster)            4.0.0-0.22.1       ---
    
    # pkg install ha-cluster/system/install
                         Packages to install:  2
                Create boot environment: No
    Create backup boot environment: No
    
    DOWNLOAD                           PKGS   FILES    XFER (MB)
    Completed                          2/2    58/58    0.4/0.4
    
    PHASE                                        ACTIONS
    Install Phase                                136/136
    
    PHASE                                  ITEMS
    Package State Update Phase             2/2
    Image State Update Phase               2/2
    

    Listing 1. Installing the Package

Customizing the Automated Cluster Installation and Configuration

Next, you need to perform some customizations.

Downloading the Oracle Solaris 11 Automated Installer Boot Image ISO File

You need to download the automated installer boot image ISO file in the Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 release, which is the release required by Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0. The binaries contained in the boot image file are later loaded to the cluster nodes during the boot-from-network process, and they allow the installation to proceed.

  1. Go to Oracle Solaris 11 Downloads page (http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/solaris11/downloads/index.html).
  2. Under the "Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 Automated Installer" section, download the boot image ISO file that corresponds to the architecture (SPARC or x86) of the cluster nodes.
  3. Save the file into a directory that can be accessed from the AI install server:
    # ls /export/home/*.iso
    /export/home/sol-11-1111-ai-x86.iso
    

Customizing the Cluster Installation

The scinstall utility is the tool for setting up the automated cluster installation and configuration. Before you use the scinstall utility, you need to plan the cluster software installation and configuration, including determining what cluster software components to install and setting up the IP addresses of the cluster nodes in any name services that are used.

The MAC address of each cluster node is used as a client identifier on the servers. Collect the MAC addresses and have them ready when you run scinstall. You will also need to specify MAC address when setting up the DHCP configuration for each node.

To customize the cluster installation, perform the following steps:

  1. Start the scinstall utility on the AI install server, and select the option 1 (Install and configure a cluster from this Automated Installer install server), as shown in Listing 2.

    # /usr/cluster/bin/scinstall
    
      *** Main Menu ***
    
        Please select from one of the following (*) options:
    
          * 1) Install and configure a cluster from this Automated Installer install server
          * 2) Print release information for this Automated Installer install server
    
          * ?) Help with menu options
          * q) Quit
    
        Option:  1
    

    Listing 2. Starting the scinstall Utility

  2. Enter the full path name of the AI boot image ISO file that you downloaded earlier, as shown in Listing 3:

      >>> Custom Automated Installer Boot Image ISO File <<<
    
        Automated Installer uses a minimal boot image to boot the client. This
        boot image ISO file is required to set up the installation. You must
        download this file and save it in a directory that can be accessed
        from this install server. Refer to your Oracle Solaris Cluster
        installation document for instructions to download this file.
    
        Be sure to download the Automated Installer boot image and not the
        live CD image or the text install image. Download the SPARC Automated
        Installer boot image for SPARC nodes, or download the x86 Automated
        Installer boot image for x86 nodes. This file must be the same version
        as the Oracle Solaris OS release that you plan to install on the
        cluster nodes.
    
        What is the full path name of the AI boot image ISO file?   /export/home/sol-11-1111-ai-x86.iso
    

    Listing 3. Specifying the Location of the ISO File

  3. Enter the root password. This password will be set up for all the cluster nodes after the installation:

      >>> Custom Automated Installer User root <<<
    
        After the automated installation is complete, you will need "root"
        user authorization to access to the cluster nodes. A password is
        required for the "root" account.
    
        Password for root:
        Re-type password to confirm:
    
  4. Enter the publisher and repository information that is requested, as shown in the example in Listing 4:

      >>> Custom Automated Installer Repositories <<<
    
        The Oracle Solaris and Oracle Solaris Cluster packages are published
        into IPS package repositories, and the packages in the latest release
        are installed directly from the repositories to the cluster nodes.
        Refer to Oracle Solaris and Oracle Solaris Cluster documentation for
        the locations of the repositories.
    
        You can also create a local package repository rather than using a
        Internet http based package repository, and make the repository
        accessible to the cluster nodes and this install server with autofs
        mount point in directory /net/<host>. Refer to Oracle Solaris
        installation documentation for creating local package repository.
    
        What is the publisher for Oracle Solaris [solaris]?  
    
        What is the repository of publisher "solaris"? http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release
    
        Accessing the repository ...done
    
        What is the publisher for Oracle Solaris Cluster [ha-cluster]?  
    
        What is the repository of publisher "ha-cluster"? /net/myrepositoryserver/export/repo
    

    Listing 4. Specifying the Publisher and Repository Information

    The cluster software components that are available in the specified repositories are listed for selection.

  5. In the list of components, select option 5 to install the ha-cluster-full package, as shown in Listing 5:

        Select the Oracle Cluster components that you want to install:
    
               Package                        Description                                       
    
            1) ha-cluster-framework-minimal   Oracle Solaris Cluster Framework minimal group package
            2) ha-cluster-framework-full      Oracle Solaris Cluster Framework full group package
            3) ha-cluster-data-services-full  Oracle Solaris Cluster Data Services full group package
            4) ha-cluster-geo-full            Oracle Solaris Cluster Geographic Edition full group package
            5) All                            All above components
    
        Option(s):  5
    

    Listing 5. Selecting the Components to Install

    Next, you will need to choose which mode, Typical or Custom, you will use to specify various cluster configuration. In the Typical mode, some of the cluster configuration values are set to default values, while in the Custom mode, you can customize the values.

    You will need to specify the following cluster configuration parameters regardless of the mode:

    • Cluster name: Can be any string less than 256 characters.
    • Name of the cluster nodes for the initial cluster configuration: The first node you list is always configured as the first member in the cluster with node ID 1. For each of the remaining nodes, the boot order after the AI installation determines the node ID.
    • MAC address of each node: For each node, this is the MAC address of the interface that the node will use to boot from the network. The interfaces will be configured as public interfaces when the nodes boot up for the first time.

      You can use the dladm command to query the MAC address of an installed adapter:

      # dladm show-phys -m net0
      LINK                SLOT     ADDRESS            INUSE   CLIENT
      net0                primary  0:14:4f:7e:57:9a   yes     net0
      
    • Transport adapters: With the standard cluster configuration method (manual installation), only the vanity adapter names, such as netX, can be specified. When you use the AI method to install and configure the cluster, both vanity and nonvanity adapter names (such as e1000g1) can be specified for the transport adapters. If nonvanity transport adapter names are specified, the cluster configuration service automatically converts them to vanity names when it adds the node to the cluster.

    In Typical mode, except for the configuration items above, which require user input, all other cluster configuration parameters are set to the default values shown in Table 1. To specify nondefault settings, you will need to choose the Custom mode.

    Table 1. Configuration Values
    Cluster Configuration Default Values (Typical Mode) Examples of Other Values That Can Be Specified (Custom Mode)
    Adding node authentication sys des
    Number of private networks two one
    Transport switch names switch1, switch2 Any string
    Private network address 172.16.0.0  
    Private network mask 255.255.240.0  
    Maximum number of nodes 64 2 ~ 64
    Maximum number of private networks 10 2 ~ 128
    Maximum number of virtual clusters 12 Any number
    Global fencing on off
  6. Select either the Typical or Custom mode, as shown in Listing 6:

      >>> Typical or Custom Mode <<<
    
        This tool supports two modes of operation, Typical mode and Custom
        mode. For most clusters, you can use Typical mode. However, you might
        need to select the Custom mode option if not all of the Typical mode
        defaults can be applied to your cluster.
    
        For more information about the differences between Typical and Custom
        modes, select the Help option from the menu.
    
        Please select from one of the following options:
    
            1) Typical
            2) Custom
    
            ?) Help
            q) Return to the Main Menu
    
        Option [1]:  
    

    Listing 6. Specifying the Mode

Confirming the Cluster Configuration

When you have answered all the questions, scinstall transfers all the specifications into command-line options for each node and requests confirmation, as shown in Listing 7. See the scinstall(1M) man page for more information about the command-line options.

  >>> Confirmation <<<

    Your responses indicate the following options to scinstall:

-----------------------------------------

 For node "phys-schost-1",
      scinstall -c /export/home/sol-11-1111-ai-x86.iso -h phys-schost-1 \
           -C clusterA \
           -F \
           -G lofi \
           -W solaris=http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release::entire,server_install:::
ha-cluster=/net/myrepositoryserver/export/repo::ha-cluster-framework-minimal,ha-cluster-framework-full,
ha-cluster-data-services-full,ha-cluster-geo-full \
           -n ip=192.168.100.98/24,mac=0:14:4f:1:dd:c0 \
           -T node=phys-schost-1,node=phys-schost-2,authtype=sys \
           -w netaddr=172.16.0.0,netmask=255.255.240.0,maxnodes=64,maxprivatenets=10,numvirtualclusters=12 \
           -A trtype=dlpi,name=net1 -A trtype=dlpi,name=bge1 \
           -B type=switch,name=switch1 -B type=switch,name=switch2 \
           -m endpoint=:net1,endpoint=switch1 \
           -m endpoint=:bge1,endpoint=switch2 \
           -P task=quorum,state=INIT \
           -U /var/cluster/run/scinstall/scinstall.pwd.1866

    Are these the options you want to use (yes/no) [yes]?  

-----------------------------------------

 For node "phys-schost-2",
      scinstall -c /export/home/sol-11-1111-ai-x86.iso -h phys-schost-2 \
           -C clusterA \
           -N phys-schost-1 \
           -G lofi \
           -W solaris=http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release::entire,server_install:::
ha-cluster=/net/myrepositoryserver/export/repo::ha-cluster-framework-minimal,ha-cluster-framework-full,
ha-cluster-data-services-full,ha-cluster-geo-full \
           -n ip=192.168.100.99/24,mac=0:14:4f:1:da:fc \
           -A trtype=dlpi,name=e1000g1 -A trtype=dlpi,name=net3 \
           -m endpoint=:e1000g1,endpoint=switch1 \
           -m endpoint=:net3,endpoint=switch2 \
           -U /var/cluster/run/scinstall/scinstall.pwd.1866

    Are these the options you want to use (yes/no) [yes]?  

Listing 7. Confirming the Options

At the end of the scinstall execution, a list of the DHCP definitions that need to be created on the DHCP server is displayed. The DHCP definitions are slightly different for SPARC and x86.

The output in Listing 8 is for x86 nodes:

    Do you want to continue with Automated Installer set up (yes/no) [yes]?  

Creating Automated Installer install service clusterA-sol-11-1111-ai-x86 ... done

Creating client to install service for node "phys-schost-1" ... done

Adding Automated Installer manifest to install service for node "phys-schost-1" ... done

Creating Automated Installer system configuration profile for node "phys-schost-1" ... done

Before you boot node "phys-schost-1" to install from the network, you must
register the node with a DHCP server using 0100144F01DDC0 as the
client ID, and create DHCP macro for this node with definition
":BootSrvA=192.168.100.1:BootFile=0100144F01DDC0:".


Creating client to install service for node "phys-schost-2" ... done

Adding Automated Installer manifest to install service for node "phys-schost-2" ... done

Creating Automated Installer system configuration profile for node "phys-schost-2" ... done

Before you boot node "phys-schost-2" to install from the network, you must
register the node with a DHCP server using 0100144F01DAFC as the
client ID, and create DHCP macro for this node with definition
":=192.168.100.1:BootFile=0100144F01DAFC:".

Listing 8. Output for x86 Nodes

The output in Listing 9 is for a SPARC node:

    Do you want to continue with Automated Installer set up (yes/no) [yes]?


Creating Automated Installer install service clusterB-sol-11-1111-ai-sparc ... done

Creating client to install service for node "phys-schost-3" ... done

Adding Automated Installer manifest to install service for node "phys-schost-3" ... done

Creating Automated Installer system configuration profile for node "phys-schost-3" ... done

Before you boot node "phys-schost-3" to install from the network, you must
register the node with a DHCP server using 0100144F025030 as the
client ID, and create DHCP macro for this node with definition ":Boot-

SrvA=192.168.100.1:BootFile=http://192.168.100.1:5555/cgi-bin/wan-
boot-cgi:".

Listing 9. Output for SPARC Node

One AI install service is created for each cluster. The name of the install service is in the format clustername-ISOfilename with the .iso extension not included.

You can list the install service, and the AI manifest and system configuration profile that are associated with the service for each client, using the installadm command, as shown in Listing 10:

# installadm list -n  clusterA-sol-11-1111-ai-x86 -c -p -m

Service Name                  Client Address     Arch   Image Path
------------                  --------------     ----     ----------
clusterA-sol-11-1111-ai-x86   00:14:4F:01:DA:FC  i386    /rpool/ai/target/clusterA-sol-11-1111-ai-x86
                              00:14:4F:01:DD:C0  i386    /rpool/ai/target/clusterA-sol-11-1111-ai-x86



Manifest                         Status      Criteria
--------                         ------      --------
phys-schost-1_manifest                       mac = 00:14:4F:01:DD:C0

phys-schost-2_manifest                       mac = 00:14:4F:01:DA:FC

orig_default                    Default      None



Profile                         Criteria
-------                         --------
phys-schost-1_profile           mac = 00:14:4F:01:DD:C0

phys-schost-2_profile           mac = 00:14:4F:01:DA:FC

Listing 10. Listing Information About the Service, Manifest File, and Profile

Performing Additional Installation Customization

The AI manifest file that is created for each client by running scinstall defines the installation parameters, including the IPS package repositories and the packages to install. On the AI install server, each manifest file is at /var/cluster/logs/install/autoscinstall.d/clustername/nodename/nodename_aimanifest.xml. These files can be updated if you want to do further customization to install extra software. The updates must be done before you start the network installation on the cluster nodes.

As shown in the software element in the AI manifest file example in Listing 11, the automated installation installs the Oracle Solaris packages entire and server_install. Package entire is an incorporation package that sets constraints on the version of the specified set of Oracle Solaris packages. Package server_install is for the AI installation.

    <software name="ips" type="IPS">
      <source>
        <publisher name="solaris">
                <origin name="http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release/"/>
        </publisher>
        <publisher name="ha-cluster">
                <origin name="file:///net/myrepositoryserver/repos/i386/Sol_11"/>
        </publisher>
      </source>
      <software_data>
        <name>entire</name>
        <name>server_install</name>
        <name>ha-cluster-data-services-full</name>
        <name>ha-cluster-framework-full</name>
        <name>ha-cluster-framework-minimal</name>
        <name>ha-cluster-geo-full</name>
        <name>ha-cluster-full</name>
      </software_data>
    </software>

Listing 11. Example Manifest File

You can update this AI manifest file manually to include other packages that are not included in the Oracle Solaris entire incorporation package. Such packages can be any extra components in the Oracle Solaris release or third-party software that is delivered in IPS format in another repository, in which case the publisher of that repository also needs to be added as a new publisher element.

The cluster packages can also be updated, but in any case, observe the following restrictions:

  • Do not remove the solaris and ha-cluster publishers.
  • Do not remove the entire and server_install packages, which define the necessary packages for automated installation.
  • You must keep at least one ha-cluster group package.

Listing 12 is an example of using the XML elements source and software_data to add a new repository and packages.

    <software name="ips" type="IPS">
      <source>
        <publisher name="solaris">
                <origin name="http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release/"/>
        </publisher>
        <publisher name="ha-cluster">
                <origin name="file:///net/myrepositoryserver/repos/i386/Sol_11"/>
        </publisher>
        <publisher name="my-ips">
                <origin name="file:///net/my-ips-repository/"/>
        </publisher>
      </source>
      <software_data>
        <name>entire</name>
        <name>server_install</name>
        <name>ha-cluster-data-services-full</name>
        <name>ha-cluster-framework-full</name>
        <name>my-ips-group-package</name>
      </software_data>
    </software>

Listing 12. Adding a New Repository and Packages

After you update the AI manifest file, use the installadm command to replace the old AI manifest file that is already associated with the install service. If needed, you can list the service name and the manifest name using the installadm list command, as shown earlier in Listing 10.

# installadm update-manifest \
  -n clusterA-sol-11-1111-ai-x86 \
  -f /var/cluster/logs/install/autoscinstall.d/clusterA/phys-schost-1/phys-schost-1_aimanifest.xml \
  -m phys-schost-1_manifest

Installing and Configuring the ISC DHCP Server

Automated installation requires you to configure the install server and boot file for the clients in a DHCP environment. A DHCP server enables you to configure the clients to automatically boot and get information from the network. The DHCP server stores information about the network configuration for the clients, the install server's IP address, and the boot files that conduct the client network installation.

Before you start booting the clients over the network, you need to configure the DHCP sever by creating the installation definitions on the DHCP server.

Installing the ISC DHCP Server Package

The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) DHCP server has been added to Oracle Solaris 11, but it might not be automatically installed and, if so, it needs to be installed manually.

If you need to install it, on the DHCP server, set the solaris publisher with an Oracle Solaris 11 repository, and install the package as follows:

# pkg publisher
PUBLISHER                     TYPE    STATUS   URI
solaris                       origin     online        https://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release
# pkg install install service/network/dhcp/isc-dhcp

Configuring the ISC DHCP Server

After you install the package, create the /etc/dhcp/dhcpd4.conf (for DHCPv4) file. This file is an ASCII text file that contains a list of statements that specify the configuration information for the ISC DHCP server daemon, dhcpd.

  1. Specify global parameters that apply to all the clients, as shown in Listing 13.

    # No IP forwarding
    option ip-forwarding           false;
    
    # The default time in seconds to lease IP to clients
    default-lease-time 600;
    # Maximum allowed time in seconds to lease IP to clients
    max-lease-time 86400;
    
    #
    # Domain name and name servers to distribute to clients that
    # is common to all supported networks.
    #
    option domain-name "oracle.com";
    option domain-name-servers 192.168.0.1;
    
    # Make this DHCP server the official DHCP server for all the configured local networks.
    authoritative;
    

    Listing 13. Global Parameters

  2. Specify a subnet declaration for every subnet that the DHCP server controls and connects to, which tells dhcpd how to recognize an address that is on that subnet.

    #
    # Declare subnet with the netmask to use, the IP range for clients, broadcast
    # address to use, and the router to use
    #
    subnet 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
      range 192.168.0.2 192.168.0.100;
      option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
      option broadcast-address 192.168.0.255;
      option routers 192.168.0.1;
    }
    

    Listing 14. Subnet Declaration

  3. Add statements for defining the cluster nodes' installation.

    The cluster nodes must be configured as clients that have static IP addresses. Such clients must have a host declaration in the dhcpd configuration file that defines each node's fixed address and a hardware parameter that uses each node's Ethernet MAC address as an identifier.

    You can group the cluster nodes' statements to specify statements that are shared by more than one node, as shown in Listing 15.

    # x86 node declaration for its MAC identifier, static IP, and boot file. The install 
    server statement applies to all the nodes in this group.
    group {
        next-server 192.168.100.1;
        host phys-schost-1 {
            hardware ethernet 00:14:4F:01:DD:C0;
            fixed-address 192.168.100.98;
            filename "0100144F01DDC0";
        }
        host phys-schost-2 {
            hardware ethernet 00:14:4F:01:DA:FC;
            fixed-address 192.168.100.99;
            filename "0100144F01DAFC";
        }
    }
    
    # A SPARC node declaration.
    host phys-schost-2 {
        hardware ethernet 00:14:4F:01:DA:FC;
        fixed-address 192.168.100.97;
        filename "http://192.168.100.1:5555/cgi-bin/wanboot-cgi";
    }
    

    Listing 15. Grouping the Cluster Nodes' Statements

    For x86 nodes, use the next-server statement, as shown in Listing 15, to specify the IP address of the AI install server. The IP address of the AI install server is indicated in the scinstall output by the value of BootSrvA, as shown below. Use the filename statement to specify the boot file, which is indicated by the value of BootFile in the scinstall output.

    Before you boot node "phys-schost-1" to install from the network, you must
    register the node with a DHCP server using 0100144F01DDC0 as the
    client ID, and create DHCP macro for this node with definition
    ":BootSrvA=192.168.100.1:BootFile=0100144F01DDC0:".
    

    For x86 nodes, the boot file name is in the form of 01 followed by the node's MAC address with the hyphen or colon separators removed, and it is used as a link to the install server to the install service created for all the cluster nodes.

    # cd /etc/netboot
    
    # ls -l 0100144F01DDC0
    lrwxrwxrwx   1 root     root          47 Nov 19 08:48 0100144F01DDC0 -> ./clusterA-
    sol-11-1111-ai-x86/boot/grub/pxegrub
    

    For SPARC nodes, use the filename statement, as shown in Listing 15, to specify the value of the BootFile object in the scinstall output, as shown below. The BootFile value includes the install server's IP address, so the next-server statement is not needed.

    Before you boot node "phys-schost-3" to install from the network, you must
    register the node with a DHCP server using 0100144F025030 as the
    client ID, and create DHCP macro for this node with definition
    ":BootSrvA=192.168.100.1:BootFile=http://192.168.100.1:5555/cgi-bin/wanboot-cgi:"
    

Starting the ISC DHCP Server

After creating the dhcpd configuration file, enable the DHCP services that will start the dhcpd server, as shown below. The network/dhcp/server:ipv4 service provides DHCP and BOOTP requests from IPv4 clients, and the network/dhcp/relay:ipv4 service relays DHCP and BOOTP requests from IPv4 clients to a network with a DHCP server.

# svcadm enable svc:/network/dhcp/server:ipv4
# svcadm enable svc:/network/dhcp/relay:ipv4

Updating the DHCP Configuration

Any time you make a change to the dhcpd configuration file, refresh and restart the services to use the newly updated data:

# svcadm refresh svc:/network/dhcp/server:ipv4
# svcadm refresh svc:/network/dhcp/relay:ipv4

Installing and Configuring the Cluster Nodes

After you have configuration set up the AI install server and configured the DHCP server, you can start the cluster nodes' installation over the network. When the installation is complete, the nodes automatically boots to join the cluster.

Installing the Cluster Nodes

  1. For SPARC cluster nodes, use the following command to boot the clients from the OBP prompt:

    ok boot net:dhcp - install
    

    For x86 cluster nodes, start the installation by using one of the following methods to boot from the network:

    • Press the appropriate function key during PXE boot. For example, some systems use F12 to boot from the network; some systems use Control-N to boot from the network.
    • Change the boot order in the BIOS.

    When the cluster nodes boot up, the GRUB menu is displayed with two menu entries similar to the following:

    Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 Text Installer and command line
    Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 Automated Install
    
  2. Within 20 seconds after the menu is displayed, select the Automated Install entry and press Return.

    By default, the Text Installer entry is selected. If the Automated Install entry is not selected within 20 seconds, the installation proceeds using the default interactive text installer method, which will not install and configure the Oracle Solaris Cluster software.

Verifying the Cluster Configuration

When all the nodes finish rebooting, the cluster installation and configuration is complete.

  1. To verify the nodes' status, log in to each node and use the two svcs commands shown in Listing 16 to check whether any cluster SMF services are in maintenance mode.

    The svc:/system/cluster/sc-ai-config:default service is in the online state only one time. It disables itself after being in online status once.

  2. Use a command such as cluster status to check the overall cluster state, as shown in Listing 16.

    # svcs -x
    
    # svcs svc:/system/cluster/sc-ai-config:default
    STATE        STIME    FMRI
    disabled       Nov_19   svc:/system/cluster/sc-ai-config:default
    
    # /usr/cluster/bin/cluster status
    
    === Cluster Nodes ===
    
    --- Node Status ---
    
    Node Name                                 Status
    --------------                            -------
    phys-schost-1                             Online
    phys-schost-2                             Online
    
    
    === Cluster Transport Paths ===
    
    Endpoint1                       Endpoint2                       Status
    ------------                    ------------                    -------
    phys-schost-1:net3              phys-schost-2:net3              Path online
    phys-schost-1:net1              phys-schost-2:net1              Path online
    
    
    === Cluster Quorum ===
    
    --- Quorum Votes Summary from (latest node reconfiguration) ---
    
                Needed      Present     Possible
                ---------   ---------   ----------
                2           3           3
    
    
    --- Quorum Votes by Node (current status) ---
    
    Node Name         Present     Possible   Status
    --------------    --------    ---------  -------
    phys-schost-1     1           1          Online
    phys-schost-2     1           1          Online
    
    
    --- Quorum Votes by Device (current status) ---
    
    Device Name       Present      Possible      Status
    -----------       ---------    ----------    -------
    d1                1            1             Online
     
    
    === Cluster Device Groups ===
    
    --- Device Group Status ---
    
    Device Group Name     Primary     Secondary     Status
    -----------------     ---------   ----------    -------
    
    
    --- Spare, Inactive, and In Transition Nodes ---
    
    Device Group Name   Spare Nodes   Inactive Nodes   In Transition Nodes
    -----------------   -----------   --------------   --------------------
    
    
    --- Multi-owner Device Group Status ---
    
    Device Group Name           Node Name           Status
    ------------------          -----------         --------
    
    === Cluster Resource Groups ===
    
    Group Name       Node Name       Suspended      State
    -------------    ---------       ------------   ------
    
    === Cluster Resources ===
    
    Resource Name       Node Name       State       Status Message
    -------------       ----------      ------      ------------------
    
    === Cluster DID Devices ===
    
    Device Instance               Node                      Status
    ---------------               -------                   -------
    /dev/did/rdsk/d1              phys-schost-1             Ok
                                  phys-schost-2             Ok
    /dev/did/rdsk/d2              phys-schost-1             Ok
                                  phys-schost-2             Ok
    /dev/did/rdsk/d3              phys-schost-1             Ok
    /dev/did/rdsk/d4              phys-schost-1             Ok
    /dev/did/rdsk/d5              phys-schost-2             Ok
    /dev/did/rdsk/d6              phys-schost-2             Ok
                                  
    === Zone Clusters ===
    
    --- Zone Cluster Status ---
    
    Name    Node Name    Zone HostName    Status    Zone Status
    ------  ----------   ---------------  -------   --------------
    

    Listing 16. Checking the Cluster Status

Additional Tasks

Using this automated installation method does the initial cluster setup. Other cluster objects—including device groups, storage, cluster file systems, zone clusters, and resources and resource groups for various data services—are not automatically created, and can be configured at any time after the initial cluster setup.

Checking the AI Installation Log Files

When the automated installation starts, progress messages are printed to both the console and a log file on each node. The log files contain more details.

During the installation, you can log in to a node as root using solaris as the password to check the log file, /system/volatile/install_log, for the progress. Note that this root account is included in the AI image and it is not the same one as created after the installation is done. Also, be aware that this log file might not be updated by the installer until some time after the IPS packages installation starts.

After the node boots up for the first time, the install log file is moved to be /var/log/install/install_log.

The AI manifest file that conducted the installation is at /var/log/install/ai.xml. This file is downloaded from the AI install server to the cluster nodes when the nodes boot from the network.

Checking the Cluster Configuration Log Files

Adding the nodes to the cluster is started by the SMF service svc:/system/cluster/sc-ai-config:default. This service configures the static IP addresses for the nodes and calls scinstall to add the nodes to the cluster. The install log is at /var/cluster/logs/install/scinstall.log.*.

The system log file /var/adm/messages also has messages related to the installation and cluster configuration.

See Also

About the Author

Lucia Lai is a software developer in the Oracle Solaris Cluster Group. Her responsibilities include, but are not limited to, Oracle Solaris Cluster system management including installation and configuration, upgrade, and command-line commands.

Revision 1.0, 09/06/2012

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