DBA: Linux

Installing Oracle Database 11g Release 1 on Enterprise Linux 5 (32- and 64-bit)

by John Smiley

Learn the basics of installing Oracle Database 11g Release 1 on Oracle Enterprise Linux 5 (or RHEL5) from the bare metal up (for evaluation purposes only).

Contents
Overview
Part I: Installing Linux
Part II: Configuring Linux for Oracle
     Create Directories
     Create the Oracle Groups and User Account
     Configure Linux Kernel Parameters
     Set Shell Limits for the oracle User
Part III: Installing Oracle
     Install the Software
Part IV: Configuring Storage
     Filesystems
     Automatic Storage Management
Conclusion
Appendix

Published January 2008

Downloads for this guide:
 Oracle Enterprise Linux 5
 Oracle Database 11g Release 1
 ASMLib

Overview

The guide provides a walkthrough of installing an Oracle Database 11g Release 1 database on commodity hardware for the purpose of evaluation .   If you are new to Linux and/or Oracle, this guide is for you. It starts with the basics and walks you through an installation of Oracle Database 11g Release 1 from the bare metal up.   Both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures are covered.  Unless otherwise indicated, the installation steps are the same for either.

This guide will take the approach of offering the easiest paths, with the fewest number of steps for accomplishing a task.  This approach often means making configuration choices that would be inappropriate for anything other than an evaluation.  For that reason, this guide is not appropriate for building production-quality environments, nor does it reflect best practices.

This guide is divided into four parts: Part I covers the installation of the Linux operating system, Part II covers configuring Linux for Oracle, Part III discusses the essentials of installing the Oracle Database, and Part IV covers creating additional filesystems and  Automatic Storage Management (ASM).  The Appendix provides information to help you get started using your new database including how to access the database interactively and how to stop and start the database and related services.


Part I: Installing Enterprise Linux 5

This section describes how to install Oracle Enterprise Linux 5 (OEL5) on your hardware (but the same steps will apply for RHEL5).  Please take a moment to make sure that your hardware meets or exceeds the minimum hardware requirements for Oracle Database 11g Release 1.

Minimum hardware requirements:

32-bit (x86)

  • x86 compatible CPU
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 10 GB available disk space (3.5 GB for the Oracle software + 1.5 GB for the database + 3 GB for OEL5 + 2 GB swap)

64-bit (x86_64)

  • x86_64 compatible CPU
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 10.5 GB available disk space (4 GB for the Oracle software + 1.5 GB for the database + 3 GB for OEL5 + 2 GB swap)

Note: Both Linux and Oracle must be installed for the same architecture. 32-bit Oracle will only run on 32-bit Linux and 64-bit Oracle will only run on 64-bit Linux.

Now, let's walk through the process of installing the Linux operating system on a server. The instructions assume a fresh install of Linux (as opposed to an upgrade), that the server will be dedicated to Oracle, and that no other operating systems or data are on the server.

Oracle Database 11g Release 1 is certified to run the base release of OEL5 without updates. Free copies of OEL5 are available for download.

  1. Boot the server using the first CD or DVD
    • You may need to change your BIOS settings to allow booting from the CD/DVD.
  2. The boot screen appears with the boot: prompt at the bottom of the screen.
    • Select Enter to continue with a graphical install on the console.
    • The installer scans your hardware
  3. Oracle Enterprise Linux splash screen
    • Click on Next
  4. Language Selection
    • Accept the default.
  5. Keyboard Configuration
    • Accept the default.
  6. Install or Upgrade
    • Select Install and click on Next
  7. Disk Partitioning Setup
    • A thorough treatment of disk partitioning is beyond the scope of this guide, which assumes that you are familiar with disk partitioning methods.
      WARNING: Improperly partitioning a disk is one of the surest and fastest ways to wipe out everything on your hard disk. If you are unsure how to proceed, stop and get help, or you will risk losing data!)
    • Accept the default partition layout.  Note that the default layout is sufficient for an evaluation, but would not be appropriate for other purposes.  The default layout may create a swap partition that is smaller than the Oracle guidelines recommend.  This is also sufficient for an evaluation.
  8. Network Configuration
    • It is usually best to configure database servers with a static IP address. To do so, click on Edit .
    • A pop-up window appears. Uncheck the Configure using DHCP box, and enter the IP Address and Netmask for the server. Be sure that Activate on boot is checked, and click on OK .
    • In the Hostname box, select manually and enter the hostname.
    • In the Miscellaneous Settings box, enter the remaining network settings.
  9. Time Zone Selection
    • Choose the time settings that are appropriate for your area. Setting the system clock to UTC is usually a good practice for servers. To do so, select on System clock uses UTC.
  10. Set Root Password
    • Enter a password for root, and enter it again to confirm.
  11. Package Installation
    • This guide will follow the Oracle recommended practice of using a "default RPMs" installation.  Accept the default software selection and click on Next.
    • Additional RPMs are required to run Oracle Database 11g Release 1.  These will be installed later.
  12. Installing Packages
    • Software will be copied to the hard disk and installed. Change disks as prompted.
  13. After software installation is complete
    • Remove any boot CD/DVD media.
    • Click on Next.
  14. Welcome
    • Click on Forward
  15. License Agreement
    • Read the license agreement. If you agree to the terms, select Yes, I agree to the License Agreement and click on Forward.
  16. Firewall Configuration
    • For the purposes of this walk-through, no firewall is configured. Select Disabled and click on Forward .
    • Click on Yes when the "Warning - No Firewall" window appears.
  17. SELinux
    • Select Disabled from the drop down bar and click on Forward.
  18. Kdump
    • Do not enable Kdump.  Accept the default and click on Forward.
  19. Date and Time
    • Set the Date and Time.
    • If you want to use an NTP server (recommended), select Enable Network Time Protocol and enter the name of the NTP server.
  20. System User
    • Create an account for yourself.
    • Do not create an account for oracle at this time. Creating the oracle account is covered later in this section.
  21. Sound Card
    • Configure the sound card, if any, and click on Forward.
  22. Additional CDs
    • Click on Finish.
  23. The system will reboot
  24. A graphical login screen appears.
  25. Congratulations! Your OEL5 software is now installed.

Installing Required Packages

Additional Linux software packages must be installed before installing the Oracle software.   The package requirements differ for 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, so this section contains separate instructions for each architecture.

32-bit (x86) Installations

Required kernel version: 2.6.18  This kernel, or any of the kernels supplied in updates, works with Oracle Database 11g Release 1 .

Check your kernel version by running the following command:

uname -r
                                      

Ex:
# uname -r
2.6.18-8.el5

Required package versions (or later):

  • compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61
  • elfutils-libelf-0.125-3.el5
  • elfutils-libelf-devel-0.125-3.el5
  • glibc-2.5-12
  • glibc-devel-2.5-12
  • glibc-common-2.5-12
  • gcc-4.1.1-52.el5
  • gcc-c++-4.1.1-52.el5
  • kernel-headers
  • libgcc-4.1.1-52.el5
  • libaio-0.3.106-3.2
  • libaio-devel-0.3.106-3.2
  • libstdc++-4.1.1-52.el5
  • libstdc++-devel-4.1.1-52.el5
  • unixODBC-2.2.11-7.1
  • unixODBC-devel-2.2.11-7.1
  • sysstat-7.0.0-3.el5
  • binutils-2.17.50.0.6-2.el5
  • make-3.81-1.1